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Ruth Gruber, who accompanied 1,000 Jews to the shores of the United States during the Holocaust, dies at 105 - The Washington Post

Ruth Gruber, who accompanied 1,000 Jews to the shores of the United States during the Holocaust, dies at 105

Ruth Gruber, who accompanied Jews to the shores of the United States during the Holocaust, dies at 105 - The Washington Post

After Hitler’s rise to power, Mildred and Arvid Harnack founded an underground group that helped imperiled Jews, assisted forced laborers, documented and archived Nazi acts of violence, especially in occupied areas in the East, and distributed anti-Hitler pamphlets. They were both caught and executed.

When the Red Orchestra Fell Silent

American woman, scholar, journalist, lecturer, teacher and translator Mildred Fish Harnack was a member of Red Orchestra and was executed in

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States.  Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

Jane Bolin - was the first African American female judge in the United States. She was the first black woman to graduate from Yale University School of Law and the first to be admitted to the New York City Bar Association.

Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for President of the United States (and who had great taste in hats). Her running mate, interestingly enough, was Frederick Douglass, the first African-American to run for Vice President.

Victoria Claflin Woodhull, later Victoria Woodhull Martin was an American leader of the woman's suffrage movement. In Woodhull was the first female candidate for President of the United States.

Women's History Post of the Day: Mary Fields was the first African American woman and the second American woman to be employed as a mail carrier with the United States Postal Service. Mary was hired by the U.S. Postal Service because she was able to hitch a team of six horses to a Stagecoach faster than anyone other applicant. She earned the nickname Stagecoach Mary because of her reliability even in inclement weather that caused her to walk up to ten miles in the snow.

Mary Fields, c. Mary Fields, also known as Stagecoach Mary (c. was the first African-American woman employed as a mail carrier in the United and just the second American woman to work for the United States Postal Service.

Irene Sendler.  Polish Catholic who during WWII smuggled 2500 infants and toddlers out of ghettos. She was eventually caught and she was beaten severely. But, she continued to fight for the children, even searching for surviving parents after the war.

Irena Sendler A 98 year-old Polish woman named Irena Sendler died in During WWII, Irena worked in the Warsaw Ghetto as a plumbing/sewer specialist. Irena smuggled Jewish children out

faith-in-humanity-restored. I actually wept when I read this.

This man deserves to be remembered…

the-hero-of-ages: “ gdfalksen: “ Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing.

Irena Sendler was a Polish Catholic social worker. During World War II, she was a member of the Polish Underground and the Żegota Polish anti-Holocaust resistance in Warsaw. She helped save 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto by providing them with false documents and sheltering them in individual and group children’s homes outside the ghetto. Despite being tortured and imprisoned by the Nazis, Sendler continued to do all she could to help Jewish children in Warsaw.

Irena Sendler was a Polish Catholic social worker. During World War II, she was a member of the Polish Underground. She helped save Jewish children ~

This photo is of a girl training to ignore white people pulling on her hair and blowing smoke in her face. Pretty morbid, but what an amazing photo. ”

Eve Arnold: School for black civil rights activists; young girl being trained to not react to smoke blown in her face or her hair being pulled. Virginia, 1960 (no link, but a reminder to find out more about SNCC training)

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