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Captain H H Davies of Birkenhead, checks a collection of paintings found in the house of a member of the SS in Hanover who had looted them from The Netherlands. Captain Davies was in charge of the Property Control Department of the Military Government, his job being to take over Nazi controlled buildings and property, including looted works of art. The latter were held for safe keeping until returned in due course to their rightful owners.

Captain H H Davies of Birkenhead, checks a collection of paintings found in the house of a member of the SS in Hanover who had looted them from The Netherlands. Captain Davies was in charge of the Property Control Department of the Military Government, his job being to take over Nazi controlled buildings and property, including looted works of art. The latter were held for safe keeping until returned in due course to their rightful owners.

Monument Men-Lt. Col. Ernest Dewald, Director of the MFAA and professor of art and archaeology, Princeton University, and other Monuments Men examine treasures from the Holy Roman Empire after their restitution to Vienna. February 1946.

Monument Men-Lt. Col. Ernest Dewald, Director of the MFAA and professor of art and archaeology, Princeton University, and other Monuments Men examine treasures from the Holy Roman Empire after their restitution to Vienna. February 1946.

This hoard of art, found in a 12th century castle belonged to Heinrich Himmler, the Nazi propaganda minister

This hoard of art, found in a 12th century castle belonged to Heinrich Himmler, the Nazi propaganda minister

Nazi looted art-Who Owns What: Nazi-Art Looting and the Question of Restitution     Nazi-looted art continues to be a controversial topic for museums in the present day. Museum Trustees and Directors should be aware of the provenance of their collections, and if they are the owners of stolen goods from Jewish victims, they should follow the numerous different professional and ethical codes presented by international societies, governments, and organizations.

Nazi looted art-Who Owns What: Nazi-Art Looting and the Question of Restitution Nazi-looted art continues to be a controversial topic for museums in the present day. Museum Trustees and Directors should be aware of the provenance of their collections, and if they are the owners of stolen goods from Jewish victims, they should follow the numerous different professional and ethical codes presented by international societies, governments, and organizations.

The Nazi Looting of Art in Europe. Göring and Hitler admire looted art

The Nazi Looting of Art in Europe. Göring and Hitler admire looted art

One of the trucks that transported the art treasures to Florence, Italy. The paintings had been stolen by the German Army and recovered by the U.S. Army and returned to the city of Florence. 7/23/45.

One of the trucks that transported the art treasures to Florence, Italy. The paintings had been stolen by the German Army and recovered by the U.S. Army and returned to the city of Florence. 7/23/45.

As allied forces fought the Nazis for control of Europe during World War II, an unlikely unit of American and British art experts formed the Allied Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section (MFAA) to wage a shadow campaign. Tasked by FDR with going into Germany to rescue artistic masterpieces from Nazi thieves, these heroes became known as The Monuments Men. On February 7, 2014, the film The Monuments Men will be released.

As allied forces fought the Nazis for control of Europe during World War II, an unlikely unit of American and British art experts formed the Allied Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section (MFAA) to wage a shadow campaign. Tasked by FDR with going into Germany to rescue artistic masterpieces from Nazi thieves, these heroes became known as The Monuments Men. On February 7, 2014, the film The Monuments Men will be released.

Stained-glass windows of Strasbourg cathedral. Charles Parkhurst Papers The Nazis had moved the Strasbourg cathedral windows to a salt mine at Heilbronn, Germany, where they were found by the Seventh US Army in April 1945. Monuments man Harry Ettlinger (right) is shown here inspecting them.

Stained-glass windows of Strasbourg cathedral. Charles Parkhurst Papers The Nazis had moved the Strasbourg cathedral windows to a salt mine at Heilbronn, Germany, where they were found by the Seventh US Army in April 1945. Monuments man Harry Ettlinger (right) is shown here inspecting them.

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