Explore Messing Versilbert, Lorica Hamata and more!

Explore related topics

Haken und Knöpfe für Lorica Hamata, Chassenard, versilbert

Haken und Knöpfe für Lorica Hamata, Chassenard, versilbert

Bague en or retrouvée au doigt d’une princesse gauloise de la nécropole de Bucy-le-Long (Aisne). IV-III BC, France

Bague en or retrouvée au doigt d’une princesse gauloise de la nécropole de Bucy-le-Long (Aisne). IV-III BC, France

Celtic torque), or neck ring, was an important piece of Celtic jewelry, and was worn before 1200 BC to as late as 600 AD. It was a powerful symbol, perhaps representing the wearer's free-born status, and was often complemented with additional rings worn about the arms and wrists. Torques were made from copper, bronze, silver, and gold. They were worn by both men and women, and are depicted as such in both Classical and Celtic sculptures.

Celtic torque), or neck ring, was an important piece of Celtic jewelry, and was worn before 1200 BC to as late as 600 AD. It was a powerful symbol, perhaps representing the wearer's free-born status, and was often complemented with additional rings worn about the arms and wrists. Torques were made from copper, bronze, silver, and gold. They were worn by both men and women, and are depicted as such in both Classical and Celtic sculptures.

Replica of a celtic Belt-Hook based on an original find from Kelheim in Germany. La Tene-Period C, 200 BC - Available on Etsy 9.99 €

Celtic belt hook replica from the La Tène period - [09 Gü-Hak Pferd]

Replica of a celtic Belt-Hook based on an original find from Kelheim in Germany. La Tene-Period C, 200 BC - Available on Etsy 9.99 €

The Tara Brooch is a Celtic brooch of about 700 AD generally considered to be the most impressive of over 50 elaborate Irish brooches to have been discovered. It was found in 1850 and rapidly recognised as one of the most important works of early Christian Irish Insular art; it is now displayed in the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tara_Brooch

The Tara Brooch is a Celtic brooch of about 700 AD generally considered to be the most impressive of over 50 elaborate Irish brooches to have been discovered. It was found in 1850 and rapidly recognised as one of the most important works of early Christian Irish Insular art; it is now displayed in the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tara_Brooch

Pinterest
Search