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15 July 1972, Nashville, Tennessee — Audience members at the Grand Ole Opry.  – Image by © Henry Horenstein /Corbis

15 July 1972, Nashville, Tennessee — Audience members at the Grand Ole Opry. – Image by © Henry Horenstein /Corbis

Henry Horenstein, Sunday Morning Gospel Show, Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival, Pennsylvania

Henry Horenstein, Sunday Morning Gospel Show, Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival, Pennsylvania

15 July 1974, Nashville, Tennessee. Grandpa Jones and his wife Ramona on the Grand Ole Opry. Image by (c) Henry Horenstein/Corbis

PHOTOGRAPHY OF HENRY HORENSTEIN AN AMERICAN ARCHIVE — HONKY TONK

15 July 1974, Nashville, Tennessee. Grandpa Jones and his wife Ramona on the Grand Ole Opry. Image by (c) Henry Horenstein/Corbis

The Grand Ole Opry House (Ryman Auditorium) in the 1940s. The auditorium first opened as the Union Gospel Tabernacle in 1892. It was built by Thomas Ryman. Ryman conceived of the auditorium as a tabernacle for the influential revivalist Samuel Porter Jones. After Ryman's death, the Tabernacle was renamed Ryman Auditorium in his honor. It was used for Grand Ole Opry broadcasts from 1943 until 1974, when the Opry built a larger venue just outside Nashville at the Opryland USA theme park.

The Grand Ole Opry House (Ryman Auditorium) in the 1940s. The auditorium first opened as the Union Gospel Tabernacle in 1892. It was built by Thomas Ryman. Ryman conceived of the auditorium as a tabernacle for the influential revivalist Samuel Porter Jones. After Ryman's death, the Tabernacle was renamed Ryman Auditorium in his honor. It was used for Grand Ole Opry broadcasts from 1943 until 1974, when the Opry built a larger venue just outside Nashville at the Opryland USA theme park.

Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two shaking the stage at The Opry. (1956)

Johnny Cash & The Tennessee Two shaking the stage at The Opry. (1956)

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