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"Money pit" is a non-stop waste of money on something.  Usage in a movie ("The Money Pit"): - I am sinking fast into the money pit... and I don't want to drag you down with me. So save yourself while there's still time. - Walter, brighten up. I hate seeing you like this. - I hate being like this. I'm a disaster.  #idiom #idioms #slang #saying #sayings #phrase #phrases #expression #expressions #english #englishlanguage #learnenglish #studyenglish #language #vocabulary #dictionary #grammar

"Money pit" is a non-stop waste of money on something. Usage in a movie ("The Money Pit"): - I am sinking fast into the money pit... and I don't want to drag you down with me. So save yourself while there's still time. - Walter, brighten up. I hate seeing you like this. - I hate being like this. I'm a disaster. #idiom #idioms #slang #saying #sayings #phrase #phrases #expression #expressions #english #englishlanguage #learnenglish #studyenglish #language #vocabulary #dictionary #grammar

"Get about" means "to visit many places".  Usage in a movie ("Klimt"): - Still working for the Duke? - The Duke? Mademoiselle De Castro's benefactor. Strange, I saw him just the other day. He asked me to pay him a visit. Since his accident he doesn't get about as much as he used to.  #phrasalverb #phrasalverbs #phrasal #verb #verbs #phrase #phrases #expression #expressions #english #englishlanguage #learnenglish #studyenglish #language #vocabulary #dictionary #grammar #efl #esl #tesl #tefl

Phrasal verbs in movies: Get about ("Klimt")

"Rush hour" is the ​time when most drivers are on the road at the same time.  Usage in a movie ("Rush Hour"): - Is there a problem, officer? - No problem. Just rush hour.

"Rush hour" is the ​time when most drivers are on the road at the same time. Usage in a movie ("Rush Hour"): - Is there a problem, officer? Just rush hour.

"Wait for the other shoe to drop" means "to wait for something bad to happen". Usage in a TV series ("Sex and the City"): - Maybe once you're into your mid-30s, it shouldn't be called dating. It should be called... "Waiting for the other shoe to drop."

"Wait for the other shoe to drop" means "to wait for something bad to happen". Usage in a TV series ("Sex and the City"): - Maybe once you're into your it shouldn't be called dating. It should be called.

"Set off" means "to ​start a ​journey". Usage in a movie ("Cowboys & Aliens"): - Round up the horses, get some supplies! We'll set off at first light! You. You're going with us. #phrasalverb #phrasalverbs #phrasal #verb #verbs #phrase #phrases #expression #expressions #english #englishlanguage #learnenglish #studyenglish #language #vocabulary #dictionary #grammar #efl #esl #tesl #tefl #toefl #ielts #toeic #englishlearning #harrisonford #danielcraig

"Set off" means "to ​start a ​journey". Usage in a movie ("Cowboys & Aliens"): - Round up the horses, get some supplies! We'll set off at first light! You. You're going with us. #phrasalverb #phrasalverbs #phrasal #verb #verbs #phrase #phrases #expression #expressions #english #englishlanguage #learnenglish #studyenglish #language #vocabulary #dictionary #grammar #efl #esl #tesl #tefl #toefl #ielts #toeic #englishlearning #harrisonford #danielcraig

"Travel light" means "to bring very few things with you when you go on a trip". Usage in a movie ("The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring"): - Leave all that can be spared behind. We travel light. Let us hunt some Orc. - Yes!

"Travel light" means "to bring very few things with you when you go on a trip". Usage in a movie ("The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring"): - Leave all that can be spared behind. We travel light. Let us hunt some Orc.

"Old maid" is an old woman who has never been married or has never had a ​sexual ​relationship.  Usage in a movie ("Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban"): - No, you see, there. You may be young in years, but the heart that beats beneath your bosom is as shriveled as an old maid's, your soul as dry as the pages of the books to which you so desperately cleave.

Idioms in movies: Old maid ("Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban")