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The Mandaic alphabet appears to be based on the Aramaic alphabet and first appeared sometime during the 2nd century AD. The Mandaic name for the alphabet is Abagada or Abaga, after the first few letters. The Mandaeans believe that all the letters of their alphabet have magical properties, and impart mysteries (raze). (...)

Mandaic is used to write Mandaic, the liturgical language of the Mandaean religion.

Modern Cyrillic script. The Cyrillic alphabet has been adapted to write more than 50 different languages, mainly in Russia, Central Asia and Eastern Europe. In many cases additional letters are used, some of which are adaptations of standard Cyrillic letters, while others are taken from the Greek or Latin alphabets. (...)

Cyrillic-relating to the Slavic alphabet derived from the Greek and traditionally attributed to St. in modified form still used in modern Slavic languages.

Armenian alphabet, language and pronunciation

Details of the Armenian alphabet and language, which is spoken mainly in Armenia by about 6 million people and belongs to its own branch of the Indo-European language family.

Ogham alphabet. Fin has a tattoo of D, A, F, and a triangle to symbolize his family and his lost clan.

Ogham Alphabet – Comparison of Early European Writing Systems: Irish Ogham, Pictish Ogham, Symbols of the Ancient Balts, Vinca Script

Yupik (Yup'ik / Юпик) The Yupik languages belong to the Yupik branch of the Eskimo language family. They are spoken by about 11,800 people in Alaska and Siberia. Yupik is written with the Latin alphabet in Alaska and with the Cyrillic alphabet in Siberia. (...)

Yupik (Yup'ik / Юпик) The Yupik languages belong to the Yupik branch of the Eskimo language family. They are spoken by about people in Alaska and Siberia. Yupik is written with the Latin alphabet in Alaska and with the Cyrillic alphabet in Siberia.

Greenlandic (Kalaallisut) is an Eskimo-Aleut language spoken by about 57,000 people in Greenland (Kalaallit Nunaat) and Denmark. There are three main dialects: West Greenlandic (Kalaallisut), East Greenlandic (Tunumiisut) and North Greenlandic (Inuktun). (...)

Greenlandic (Kalaallisut) is an Eskimo-Aleut language spoken by about people in Greenland (Kalaallit Nunaat) and Denmark. There are three main dialects: West Greenlandic (Kalaallisut), East Greenlandic (Tunumiisut) and North Greenlandic (Inuktun).

Dungan (хуэйзў йүян / huejzw jyian) is a variety of Chinese spoken in Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. There are approximately 90,000 speakers. The native name for the language is Хуэйзў йүян, which means 'language of the Hui'. In Chinese it is known as 东干语 (dōnggānyǔ). (...)

Dungan is a variety of Chinese written with the Cyrillic alphabet and spoken in Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan by about people.

Old Church Slavonic version of the Cyrillic alphabet (10th century)

The Cyrillic alphabet (Template:Pron-en) or azbuka is an alphabetic writing system developed in.

Luxembourgish (Lëtzebuergesch) is a Germanic language spoken by about 400,000 people in Luxembourg (Lëtzebuerg), France (Frankräich), Belgium (Belsch) and Germany (Däitschland). There are also a few Luxembourgish speakers in the USA. It has a lot in common with German and Dutch, and has also borrowed some words from French, e.g. merci (thank you). (...)

Luxembourgish is a West Germanic language spoken in Luxembourg, France, Germany and Belgium by about people.

Nǁng or Nǁŋǃke, which is also known as Nǀu, is the only surviving member of the !Ui branch of the Tuu or Khoisan language family. It was declared extinct in 1973, but in the 1990s the South African San Institute managed to find 25 people who could speak or understand the language. Today there are fewer than 10 speakers left in South Africa and Botswana, but they use Afrikaans or Tswana as their every day languages rather than Nǁng. (...)

Information about Nǁng, a Tuu/Koisan language spoken in South Africa and Botswana by fewer than 10 people.

This is the Sanskrit language. This language is an Indo-Aryan language. This language is most common in those that practice the Hindu religion. It's also popular in Buddhism and Jainism

An Indo-Aryan language, Sanskrit is commonly spoken by those that practice Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

The Pahawh Hmong alphabet was invented in 1959 by Shong Lue Yang (Shong Lue Yang's name in the Pahawh Hmong alphabet), an illiterate Hmong farmer living in northern Laos close to the border with Vietnam. Used to write Hmong, a Hmong-Mien language spoken by about 2.6 million people in China, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, USA, and French Guiana. (...)

The Pahawh Hmong alphabet was invented in 1959 to write the Hmong language of Vietnam. It is a type of syllabic alphabet.

Khoekhoe alphabet and pronunication

Khoekhoe (Nama) is a Khoisan language spoken in South Africa, Botswana and Namibia by about people.

Malay (Bahasa Melayu / بهاس ملايو) is an Austronesian language spoken in Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Brunei and Thailand. The total number of speakers of Standard Malay is about 18 million. There are also about 170 million people who speak Indonesian, which is a form of Malay. (...)

Universal of Culture - Language. The official language in Malaysia is Malaysian.

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