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Quasars and interstellar water  The farther something is from us, the longer its light must travel to get to us. When we observe an object that is 13 billion light-years away—like some of the oldest stars—we are actually seeing what it looked like 13 billion years ago. Looking back in time at distant objects can give us clues about the properties of the early universe. Quasars, or “quasi-stellar radio sources,” are the most distant objects that we can see. [click for more]

Quasars and interstellar water The farther something is from us, the longer its light must travel to get to us. When we observe an object that is 13 billion light-years away—like some of the oldest stars—we are actually seeing what it looked like 13 billion years ago. Looking back in time at distant objects can give us clues about the properties of the early universe. Quasars, or “quasi-stellar radio sources,” are the most distant objects that we can see. [click for more]

Black hole...located in the direction of the constellation of Virgo, is so far away that the light from it has taken 11 billion years to reach Earth, so we see it as it appeared in the early Universe. The monster black hole has more than 10 billion times the mass of the Sun and 10,000 times the mass of the super-massive black hole in our own Milky Way, making it one of the most massive ever seen...there may be as many as 400 such giant black holes in the part of the universe... - See more…

Black hole...located in the direction of the constellation of Virgo, is so far away that the light from it has taken 11 billion years to reach Earth, so we see it as it appeared in the early Universe. The monster black hole has more than 10 billion times the mass of the Sun and 10,000 times the mass of the super-massive black hole in our own Milky Way, making it one of the most massive ever seen...there may be as many as 400 such giant black holes in the part of the universe... - See more…

Black Hole Wind. A composite x-ray/optical image of the active NGC 1068 galaxy reveals an enormous plume of hot gas emanating from the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center. Scientists think the shape and speed of the plume, which moves at about 1 million miles an hour, are caused by the funneling effect of a doughnut-shaped ring of cooler gas and dust that surrounds the black hole.

Black Hole Wind. A composite x-ray/optical image of the active NGC 1068 galaxy reveals an enormous plume of hot gas emanating from the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center. Scientists think the shape and speed of the plume, which moves at about 1 million miles an hour, are caused by the funneling effect of a doughnut-shaped ring of cooler gas and dust that surrounds the black hole.

NGC2359 (also known as Thor's Helmet) is an emission nebula in the constellation CanisMajor. The nebula is approximately 15,000 light-years away and 30 light years in size.

NGC2359 (also known as Thor's Helmet) is an emission nebula in the constellation CanisMajor. The nebula is approximately 15,000 light-years away and 30 light years in size.

Just in time for Valentine's Day comes a new image of a ring - not of jewels - but of black holes. This composite image of Arp 147, a pair of interacting galaxies located about 430 million light years from Earth, shows X-rays from the NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (pink) and optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (red, green, blue) produce

Giant Ring of Black Holes

Just in time for Valentine's Day comes a new image of a ring - not of jewels - but of black holes. This composite image of Arp 147, a pair of interacting galaxies located about 430 million light years from Earth, shows X-rays from the NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (pink) and optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (red, green, blue) produce

Zeta Ophiuchi (an enormous star whose mass is more than 19 times that of our Sun and whose size is eight times that of its radius) is located in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 2.57, making it only the third brightest star in the constellation.

Zeta Ophiuchi (an enormous star whose mass is more than 19 times that of our Sun and whose size is eight times that of its radius) is located in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 2.57, making it only the third brightest star in the constellation.