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Andromeda Galaxy by Jeff Johnson

Andromeda Galaxy by Jeff Johnson

This new portrait of the Andromeda Galaxy, or M31, was taken with the Subaru Telescope's new high-resolution imaging camera, the Hyper-Suprime Cam (HSC).

This new portrait of the Andromeda Galaxy, or M31, was taken with the Subaru Telescope's new high-resolution imaging camera, the Hyper-Suprime Cam (HSC).

Carina nebula. A portion of the Keyhole (the dark mass on the bottom), and on the top left, one of many dense molecular clouds of gas and dust being simultaneously compressed by the hot gases surrounding them, and ionized by the intense ultraviolet radiation from nearby stars. Within a few million years, most of the gases in the molecular cloud will be scattered and mixed with its surroundings. But stars now forming in its interior will gleam brightly, once their dusty shroud is removed.

Carina nebula. A portion of the Keyhole (the dark mass on the bottom), and on the top left, one of many dense molecular clouds of gas and dust being simultaneously compressed by the hot gases surrounding them, and ionized by the intense ultraviolet radiation from nearby stars. Within a few million years, most of the gases in the molecular cloud will be scattered and mixed with its surroundings. But stars now forming in its interior will gleam brightly, once their dusty shroud is removed.

At the end of last month, a long standing solar filament suddenly erupted into space producing an energetic Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The explosion shot electrons and ions into the Solar System, some arrived at Earth three days later and impacted Earth's magnetosphere, causing visible aurorae. If you missed this auroral display, do not despair, over the next two years our Sun will be experiencing a solar maximum of activity promising to produce more CMEs that induce more Earthly auroras.

At the end of last month, a long standing solar filament suddenly erupted into space producing an energetic Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The explosion shot electrons and ions into the Solar System, some arrived at Earth three days later and impacted Earth's magnetosphere, causing visible aurorae. If you missed this auroral display, do not despair, over the next two years our Sun will be experiencing a solar maximum of activity promising to produce more CMEs that induce more Earthly auroras.

My God is THE artist.and even if this is photoshopped, my previous statement still stands, haha.

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