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Bridget “Biddy” Mason, born a slave in Mississippi in 1818, achieved financial success that enabled her to support her extended family for generations despite the fact that she was illiterate. In a landmark case she sued her master for their freedom, saved her earnings, invested in real estate, and became a well-known philanthropist in Los Angeles, California.

Bridget “Biddy” Mason, born a slave in Mississippi in 1818, achieved financial success that enabled her to support her extended family for generations despite the fact that she was illiterate. In a landmark case she sued her master for their freedom, saved her earnings, invested in real estate, and became a well-known philanthropist in Los Angeles, California.

Dr. Hans Munch, called the "Good Man Of Auschwitz", was the only doctor who helped the prisoners from the inside. He faked experiments to keep the prisoners from being gassed, refused to choose those to be killed at risk of his own life, and even helped some escape. . At risk of his own life, he did what he could to save as many as he could. He was later put on trial, but because of so many Jewish witnesses stating his goodness to them, he was completely acquitted.B/W Photo Colourised by…

Dr. Hans Munch, called the "Good Man Of Auschwitz", was the only doctor who helped the prisoners from the inside. He faked experiments to keep the prisoners from being gassed, refused to choose those to be killed at risk of his own life, and even helped some escape. . At risk of his own life, he did what he could to save as many as he could. He was later put on trial, but because of so many Jewish witnesses stating his goodness to them, he was completely acquitted.B/W Photo Colourised by…

In 1896, in the case of Plessy v. Ferguson, the court ruled that forcing African Americans to sit in separate railway cars was legal. But the cars had to be equal to those for whites. This was called the “separate but equal” ruling. It was used to justify segregation in all kinds of public places. But in 1954, the court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that separate schools for African American children were, by their very nature, unequal.  From our Topic The Supreme Court | Kids…

In 1896, in the case of Plessy v. Ferguson, the court ruled that forcing African Americans to sit in separate railway cars was legal. But the cars had to be equal to those for whites. This was called the “separate but equal” ruling. It was used to justify segregation in all kinds of public places. But in 1954, the court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that separate schools for African American children were, by their very nature, unequal. From our Topic The Supreme Court | Kids…

The neuroscience behind Bruce Lee’s one-inch punch is this…

The neuroscience behind Bruce Lee’s one-inch punch is this…

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