Explore Goddess Idunna, Norse Goddess and more!

Kvasir  In Norse mythology, Kvasir was a being born of the saliva of the Æsir and the Vanir, two groups of gods. Extremely wise, Kvasir traveled far and wide, teaching and spreading knowledge. This continued until the dwarfs Fjalar and Galar killed Kvasir and drained him of his blood. The two mixed his blood with honey, resulting in the Mead of Poetry, a mead which imbues the drinker with skaldship and wisdom, and the spread of which eventually resulted in the introduction of poetry to…

Kvasir In Norse mythology, Kvasir was a being born of the saliva of the Æsir and the Vanir, two groups of gods. Extremely wise, Kvasir traveled far and wide, teaching and spreading knowledge. This continued until the dwarfs Fjalar and Galar killed Kvasir and drained him of his blood. The two mixed his blood with honey, resulting in the Mead of Poetry, a mead which imbues the drinker with skaldship and wisdom, and the spread of which eventually resulted in the introduction of poetry to…

Emily Balivet

Emily Balivet

In Irish lore, The Sidhe (pronounced shee), or Aos Sí (shee), were descendants of the divine inhabitants of Ireland. They are members of a powerful supernatural race comparable to the fairies or elves of old. They are often called the Kings and Queens of the Fairies. However, they are neither winged nor diminutive, and are in no way like the cute little fairies of our modern-day imagination.

In Irish lore, The Sidhe (pronounced shee), or Aos Sí (shee), were descendants of the divine inhabitants of Ireland. They are members of a powerful supernatural race comparable to the fairies or elves of old. They are often called the Kings and Queens of the Fairies. However, they are neither winged nor diminutive, and are in no way like the cute little fairies of our modern-day imagination.

Gwenhwyfar "Gwenhwyfar, the Welsh Goddess, is believed to have existed as long as there has been surf to pound against rocky shores. Praised for her wise judgement, it was prophesied that no man could rule Wales without her by his side." She is also known as Guinevere, or Gueneva. Her name means "White Shadow" or "White One" which is another name for a Fairy Goddess.

Gwenhwyfar "Gwenhwyfar, the Welsh Goddess, is believed to have existed as long as there has been surf to pound against rocky shores. Praised for her wise judgement, it was prophesied that no man could rule Wales without her by his side." She is also known as Guinevere, or Gueneva. Her name means "White Shadow" or "White One" which is another name for a Fairy Goddess.

THE DAGDA (Dagda Mór, Daghda, Dagdae, Daghdha) was perhaps the greatest of the gods, given that his name seems to have meant the "Good God". The old Irish tract called "The Choice of Names" tells us that he was a god of the earth; he had a cauldron called "The Undry", in which everyone found food in proportion to his merits, and from which none went away unsatisfied. He also had a living harp; as he played upon it, the seasons came in their order.

THE DAGDA (Dagda Mór, Daghda, Dagdae, Daghdha) was perhaps the greatest of the gods, given that his name seems to have meant the "Good God". The old Irish tract called "The Choice of Names" tells us that he was a god of the earth; he had a cauldron called "The Undry", in which everyone found food in proportion to his merits, and from which none went away unsatisfied. He also had a living harp; as he played upon it, the seasons came in their order.

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