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What will happen to the world when we're no longer here? All that we've created and built – schools, hospitals, museums, homes? Will they fall so easily to ruin? Overtaken by nature and quickly turned...

What will happen to the world when we're no longer here? All that we've created and built – schools, hospitals, museums, homes? Will they fall so easily to ruin? Overtaken by nature and quickly turned...

Abandoned Buildings: Photographer shows us a glimpse of the end of the world | Creative Boom

Abandoned Buildings: Photographer shows us a glimpse of the end of the world | Creative Boom

Abandoned Buildings: A glimpse of the end of the world by German photographer Christian Richter

Abandoned Buildings: A glimpse of the end of the world by German photographer Christian Richter

What will happen to the world when we're no longer here? All that we've created and built – schools, hospitals, museums, homes? Will they fall so easily to ruin? Overtaken by nature and quickly turned...

What will happen to the world when we're no longer here? All that we've created and built – schools, hospitals, museums, homes? Will they fall so easily to ruin? Overtaken by nature and quickly turned...

The Bulow Woods Trail runs a 6.8-mile path shaded by majestic oaks. Keep an eye out for white-tailed deer, barred owls and other native wildlife. The trail ends at Bulow Plantation Ruins Historic State Park, where the plantation was burned down by Seminole Indians in 1836 during the Second Seminole War. The buildings were made of coquina and included the largest sugar mill in Florida. The park has an outdoor museum to preserve the ruins and artifacts found at the site.

This Hike In Florida Will Give You An Unforgettable Experience

The Bulow Woods Trail runs a 6.8-mile path shaded by majestic oaks. Keep an eye out for white-tailed deer, barred owls and other native wildlife. The trail ends at Bulow Plantation Ruins Historic State Park, where the plantation was burned down by Seminole Indians in 1836 during the Second Seminole War. The buildings were made of coquina and included the largest sugar mill in Florida. The park has an outdoor museum to preserve the ruins and artifacts found at the site.

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