Explore Creations and more!

In a picture that captures the violence and sheer destruction inherent in war perhaps more graphically than any other ever published in LIFE, Marines take cover on an Iwo Jima hillside amid the burned-out remains of banyan jungle, as a Japanese bunker is obliterated in March 1945. (W. Eugene Smith—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images) See more: http://ti.me/Ot3lla

In a picture that captures the violence and sheer destruction inherent in war perhaps more graphically than any other ever published in LIFE, Marines take cover on an Iwo Jima hillside amid the burned-out remains of banyan jungle, as a Japanese bunker is obliterated in March 1945. (W. Eugene Smith—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images) See more: http://ti.me/Ot3lla

eugene smith  Tomoko in Her Bath, Mother and daughter with Minamata Disease, Japan

eugene smith Tomoko in Her Bath, Mother and daughter with Minamata Disease, Japan

Life Magazine Cover Copyright 1945  Iwo Jima Detonation - www.MadMenArt.com | Life Magazine ran weekly from 1883 to 1972. First as a humor and general interest magazine and from 1936 it was the worldwide magazine No.1 in photojournalism.

Life Magazine Cover Copyright 1945 Iwo Jima Detonation - www.MadMenArt.com | Life Magazine ran weekly from 1883 to 1972. First as a humor and general interest magazine and from 1936 it was the worldwide magazine No.1 in photojournalism.

On Veteran's Day, here are some of the greatest pictures to run in LIFE during World War II — from Blitz-ravaged London to the sands and jungles of the Pacific. See more: http://ti.me/1ExpesQ  Pictured: Iwo Jima, 1945  (W. Eugene Smith—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

On Veteran's Day, here are some of the greatest pictures to run in LIFE during World War II — from Blitz-ravaged London to the sands and jungles of the Pacific. See more: http://ti.me/1ExpesQ Pictured: Iwo Jima, 1945 (W. Eugene Smith—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

Unpublished. American troops chat near a dead Japanese soldier on Iwo Jima. The degree to which the Japanese were willing to fight to the death, rather than surrender, is summed up in one remarkable statistic: Close to 20,000 Japanese soldiers were killed during the battle; only around 200 were captured.  Read more: http://life.time.com/history/world-war-ii-classic-photos-from-life-magazine/#ixzz2SSjbgFoV

Unpublished. American troops chat near a dead Japanese soldier on Iwo Jima. The degree to which the Japanese were willing to fight to the death, rather than surrender, is summed up in one remarkable statistic: Close to 20,000 Japanese soldiers were killed during the battle; only around 200 were captured. Read more: http://life.time.com/history/world-war-ii-classic-photos-from-life-magazine/#ixzz2SSjbgFoV

Into the Light: Photo by W. Eugene Smith, 1946. Smith was a WWII photojournalist (See my Iwo Jima pin) who was seriously wounded  while covering the Battle of Okinawa. This was his first photograph in the post-war era. He chose his own children as the subject, as a life-affirming message after witnessing so much destruction.

Into the Light: Photo by W. Eugene Smith, 1946. Smith was a WWII photojournalist (See my Iwo Jima pin) who was seriously wounded while covering the Battle of Okinawa. This was his first photograph in the post-war era. He chose his own children as the subject, as a life-affirming message after witnessing so much destruction.

Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Search