Explore Female Sports, Vintage Tennis and more!

ntwerp 1920, Games of the VII Olympiad. Frenchwoman Suzanne LENGLEN, winner of the women’s tennis single and mixed double events. Credit: IOC Olympic Museum Collections

ntwerp 1920, Games of the VII Olympiad. Frenchwoman Suzanne LENGLEN, winner of the women’s tennis single and mixed double events. Credit: IOC Olympic Museum Collections

Eleonora R. Sears was not just the great-great-granddaughter of Thomas Jefferson, she was also a well-known athlete in the early 20th C. She made waves playing tennis with rolled up shirt sleeves and caused a stir in when she rode front-saddle into an all-male polo arena while wearing pants. Despite receiving criticism for her unfeminine style, she remained popular at home and abroad, and has been called “The Mother of Title IX” for her impact on women in sports.

The Mother of Title IX: Trailblazing Athlete Eleonora Sears

Eleonora R. Sears was not just the great-great-granddaughter of Thomas Jefferson, she was also a well-known athlete in the early 20th C. She made waves playing tennis with rolled up shirt sleeves and caused a stir in when she rode front-saddle into an all-male polo arena while wearing pants. Despite receiving criticism for her unfeminine style, she remained popular at home and abroad, and has been called “The Mother of Title IX” for her impact on women in sports.

Suzanne Rachel Flore Lenglen (24 May 1899 – 4 July 1938) was a French tennis player who won 31 Championship titles between 1914 and 1926. A trendsetting athlete, named La Divine (the divine one) by the French press.

Suzanne Rachel Flore Lenglen (24 May 1899 – 4 July 1938) was a French tennis player who won 31 Championship titles between 1914 and 1926. A trendsetting athlete, named La Divine (the divine one) by the French press.

Pinterest
Search