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Relief with Winged Genius • Neo-Assyrian, 883-859 B.C.

Relief with Winged Genius • Neo-Assyrian, 883-859 B.C.

Period: Neo-Assyrian Date: ca. 883–859 B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) Culture: Assyrian Medium: Gypsum alabaster Dimensions: 90 1/2 x 84 1/2 x 6 in. (229.9 x 214.6 x 15.2 cm)

Period: Neo-Assyrian Date: ca. 883–859 B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) Culture: Assyrian Medium: Gypsum alabaster Dimensions: 90 1/2 x 84 1/2 x 6 in. (229.9 x 214.6 x 15.2 cm)

Relief panel Period: Neo-Assyrian Date: ca. 883–859 B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) Culture: Assyrian Medium: Gypsum alabaster

Relief panel Period: Neo-Assyrian Date: ca. 883–859 B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) Culture: Assyrian Medium: Gypsum alabaster

Large stone sculptures and reliefs were a striking feature of the palaces and temples of ancient Assyria (modern northern Iraq). An entrance to the royal palace of King Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC) at Nimrud was flanked by two colossal winged human-headed lions. A gigantic standing lion stood at the entrance to the nearby Temple of Ishtar, the goddess of war.

Large stone sculptures and reliefs were a striking feature of the palaces and temples of ancient Assyria (modern northern Iraq). An entrance to the royal palace of King Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC) at Nimrud was flanked by two colossal winged human-headed lions. A gigantic standing lion stood at the entrance to the nearby Temple of Ishtar, the goddess of war.

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7) Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern IraqNeo-Assyrian c. 883-859 BC This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible. Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the…

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7) Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern IraqNeo-Assyrian c. 883-859 BC This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible. Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the…

Stela of Ashurnasirpal II -   Neo-Assyrian, about 883-859 BC  From Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Iraq    The Assyrian king worshipping gods and recording his achievements.    This freestanding gypsum monument was erected by King Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 883-859 BC). During his reign this form of commemorative sculpture appears in this form.

Stela of Ashurnasirpal II - Neo-Assyrian, about 883-859 BC From Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Iraq The Assyrian king worshipping gods and recording his achievements. This freestanding gypsum monument was erected by King Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 883-859 BC). During his reign this form of commemorative sculpture appears in this form.

The Statue of Ashurnasirpal II is a rare example of Assyrian sculpture in the round that was found in the mid nineteenth century at the ancient site of Kalhu (now known as Nimrud) by the famous archaeologist Austen Henry Layard. Dating from 883-859 BC, the statue has long been admired for its flawless condition and the high quality of its craftsmanship. The statue was originally placed in the Temple of Ishtar to remind the deity of the king's devotion & piety

The Statue of Ashurnasirpal II is a rare example of Assyrian sculpture in the round that was found in the mid nineteenth century at the ancient site of Kalhu (now known as Nimrud) by the famous archaeologist Austen Henry Layard. Dating from 883-859 BC, the statue has long been admired for its flawless condition and the high quality of its craftsmanship. The statue was originally placed in the Temple of Ishtar to remind the deity of the king's devotion & piety

This fierce, 15-tonne lion symbolised Ishtar, the Assyrian goddess of war, and guarded the entrance to her temple. The cuneiform inscription gives the name of the temple's builder, the neo-Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 883-859 BC). Large stone sculptures and reliefs of mythological figures were a striking feature of the palaces and temples of ancient Assyria.

This fierce, 15-tonne lion symbolised Ishtar, the Assyrian goddess of war, and guarded the entrance to her temple. The cuneiform inscription gives the name of the temple's builder, the neo-Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 883-859 BC). Large stone sculptures and reliefs of mythological figures were a striking feature of the palaces and temples of ancient Assyria.

The palace rooms at Nimrud were decorated with large stone slabs carved in low relief, with brightly painted walls and ceilings and sculptural figures guarding the doorways. The throne room contained narrative scenes commemorating the military victories of Ashurnasirpal, while in other areas of the palace were protective figures and images of the king and his retinue performing ritual acts

The palace rooms at Nimrud were decorated with large stone slabs carved in low relief, with brightly painted walls and ceilings and sculptural figures guarding the doorways. The throne room contained narrative scenes commemorating the military victories of Ashurnasirpal, while in other areas of the palace were protective figures and images of the king and his retinue performing ritual acts

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