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At 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17, Edouard's maximum sustained winds were near 90 mph (150 kph) and weakening is forecast. The eye of Hurricane Edouard was located near latitude 36.4 north and longitude 53.3 west. Edouard is moving toward the northeast near 24 mph (39 kph) and turn east on Sept. 18. The latest minimum central pressure reported by a NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft is 958 millibars.

Edouard (was TD6 - Atlantic Ocean)

At 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17, Edouard's maximum sustained winds were near 90 mph (150 kph) and weakening is forecast. The eye of Hurricane Edouard was located near latitude 36.4 north and longitude 53.3 west. Edouard is moving toward the northeast near 24 mph (39 kph) and turn east on Sept. 18. The latest minimum central pressure reported by a NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft is 958 millibars.

Genevieve (Eastern Pacific Ocean). The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean formed and quickly ramped up to a tropical storm named "Genevieve." NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn storm being trailed by two other areas of developing low pressure to its east. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Tropical Storm Genevieve was born on July 25 at 5 a.m. EDT. At that time, Genevieve had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kph).

Genevieve (Eastern Pacific Ocean)

Genevieve (Eastern Pacific Ocean). The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean formed and quickly ramped up to a tropical storm named "Genevieve." NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn storm being trailed by two other areas of developing low pressure to its east. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Tropical Storm Genevieve was born on July 25 at 5 a.m. EDT. At that time, Genevieve had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kph).

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 after it formed in the Central Pacific Ocean.

Ana (Central Pacific)

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 after it formed in the Central Pacific Ocean.

On Monday, Oct. 20, the U.K. Meteorological Service issued a National Severe Weather Warning for the U.K.:  but there remains the potential for disruption to travel, especially as the strongest winds coincide with the morning rush hour in places. Fallen leaves impeding drainage increases the risk of surface water affecting roads, while some damage to trees is possible, given that many are still in full leaf." For updated warnings from the U.K. Met Service, visit: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk.

Gonzalo (Atlantic Ocean)

On Monday, Oct. 20, the U.K. Meteorological Service issued a National Severe Weather Warning for the U.K.: but there remains the potential for disruption to travel, especially as the strongest winds coincide with the morning rush hour in places. Fallen leaves impeding drainage increases the risk of surface water affecting roads, while some damage to trees is possible, given that many are still in full leaf." For updated warnings from the U.K. Met Service, visit: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk.

One week after the official start of hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, the first tropical depression was born hundreds of miles southwest of Mexico. NASA's TRMM satellite and NOAA's GOES-West satellites provided looks inside and outside of the depression's clouds. Hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific began officially on May 15. 1E (Eastern Pacific Ocean)

Amanda (was 1E - Eastern Pacific Ocean)

One week after the official start of hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, the first tropical depression was born hundreds of miles southwest of Mexico. NASA's TRMM satellite and NOAA's GOES-West satellites provided looks inside and outside of the depression's clouds. Hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific began officially on May 15. 1E (Eastern Pacific Ocean)

On Sept. 15 at 2:35 p.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite saw the northern fringes of Hurricane Odile straddling the border with southern California and Arizona. By the next day, September 16, NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw an outer band of the now weakened Tropical Storm Odile affecting Arizona.

On Sept. 15 at 2:35 p.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite saw the northern fringes of Hurricane Odile straddling the border with southern California and Arizona. By the next day, September 16, NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw an outer band of the now weakened Tropical Storm Odile affecting Arizona.

The center of Tropical Storm Ana was located near latitude 14.1 north, longitude 150.3 west. That's about 500 miles (805 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.  Ana is moving toward the west near 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to turn to the northwest on Oct. 17. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars.  Ana is forecast to move to the west-northwest and strengthen into a hurricane, approaching the big island of Hawaii by Saturday,   http://www.prh.noaa.gov.

Ana (Central Pacific)

The center of Tropical Storm Ana was located near latitude 14.1 north, longitude 150.3 west. That's about 500 miles (805 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. Ana is moving toward the west near 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to turn to the northwest on Oct. 17. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars. Ana is forecast to move to the west-northwest and strengthen into a hurricane, approaching the big island of Hawaii by Saturday, http://www.prh.noaa.gov.

Hurricane Polo still appears rounded in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite, but forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that to change.

Polo (Eastern Pacific)

Hurricane Polo still appears rounded in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite, but forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that to change.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Sept. 30 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT). In the infrared image, Tropical Storm Rachel appeared small in comparison to the low pressure area called System 90E, coming together hundreds of miles south. As Rachel spins down over cool waters west of Baja California, Mexico, southwesterly wind shear was obvious in the GOES-West image because the bulk of Rachel's clouds had been pushed to the north.

Rachel (Eastern Pacific)

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Sept. 30 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT). In the infrared image, Tropical Storm Rachel appeared small in comparison to the low pressure area called System 90E, coming together hundreds of miles south. As Rachel spins down over cool waters west of Baja California, Mexico, southwesterly wind shear was obvious in the GOES-West image because the bulk of Rachel's clouds had been pushed to the north.

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