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A class of 28 students earned popsicles. The teacher bought two boxes of popsicles, with 12 in each box. How many more popsicles does the teacher need to avoid a scarcity of popsicles in her classroom? (Elementary) OCTOBER

A class of 28 students earned popsicles. The teacher bought two boxes of popsicles, with 12 in each box. How many more popsicles does the teacher need to avoid a scarcity of popsicles in her classroom?

Teachers: Bring Jay Eagle to your classroom! Sign-up for this project to introduce your students to the Fed and help them explore their local economy.

Have you met Jay Eagle, our Fed Ambassador? He wants to visit your classroom and help educate students about their local economy.

Help students explore the local, regional or state economy as well as the geography of their area using the “Jay Flies Through 10-J” lesson from the Kansas City Fed. Follow the lesson steps to discuss the resources, businesses, entertainment and tourist sites in your community.

Hear about Jay’s journey through the Federal Reserve District as told by elementary students.

After teaching about the scientific method, challenge students to perform a financial experiment following the method. Examples might be: “Do kids spend more at the mall on a rainy day?” or “Does visiting a bank encourage kids to save money?”

The Kansas City Fed offers free economic and personal finance resources for educators, bankers and consumers. We believe individuals of all ages who understand how the economy functions and know what tools are available make better financial decisions.

In this lesson, students listen to the book Uncle Jed’s Barbershop, about an African American barber who, despite significant setbacks, saves enough money to buy his own barbershop.

In this lesson, students listen to the book Uncle Jed’s Barbershop, about an African American barber who, despite significant setbacks, saves enough money to buy his own barbershop.

Using this workbook, students take a closer look at nickels and quarters commemorating many of the proudest moments in our country. They can also design a state coin, match fun facts with the correct state, locate Fed branch cities on a map and determine which states are endowed with particular natural resources.

In this free lesson, students look at coins commemorating many of the proudest moments in the U. and the 7 states that make up the Fed's Eighth District.

In this lesson, students use economic data and wartime propaganda to learn important lessons about resource scarcity on the World War II home front.

In this lesson, students use economic data and wartime propaganda to learn important lessons about resource scarcity on the World War II home front.

Create an economic obstacle course. Set up three or four econ stations outside, each with an economics question to solve. Students can weave through cones, bounce balls or run bases to get from one station to the next.

Create an economic obstacle course. Set up three or four econ stations outside, each with an economics question to solve. Students can weave through cones, bounce balls or run bases to get from one station to the next.

Read Glo Goes Shopping by Cheryl Willis Hudson. Use the related children's literature lesson plan from the St. Louis Fed to discuss spending, decision making and opportunity cost.

In this free lesson, students learn about saving, spending, decision making and opportunity cost and how to use a decision-making grid.

FederalReserveEducation.org offers educators a place to find a variety of  FREE #economics and #personalfinance education resources for all levels of students.

The Federal Reserve Education website offers educators a place to find a variety of FREE and education resources for all levels of students.

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