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A shift in the cropping pattern to cope with a deteriorating monsoon during the mature phase of the Harappan civilisation could be the first direct evidence of early humans adapting to climate change, a new study suggests...

A shift in the cropping pattern to cope with a deteriorating monsoon during the mature phase of the Harappan civilisation could be the first direct evidence of early humans adapting to climate change, a new study suggests...

WUWT: Study: Rapid climate changes across northern hemisphere in the earliest Middle Pleistocene

Early Christian ‘Bishop's Basilica’ in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, reveals hidden secrets

Built between the and century AD in the Roman city of Philippopopolis, nowadays Plovdiv, the Bishop’s Basilica is one of the most important Christian places of worship found in Bulgaria dating from that period.

An image from the geophysical survey

Possible evidence of Norse parliament

Evidence points to wider Norse settlement in Scotland's Caithness brochs

Study suggests tectonic plates began moving half a billion years earlier than thought | UChicago News

Study suggests tectonic plates began moving half a billion years earlier than thought

Study suggests tectonic plates began moving half a billion years earlier than thought | UChicago News

Mother Earth

Radiocarbon dating of a fossilized leg bone from a Jamaican monkey called Xenothrix mcgregori suggests it may be the one of the most recent primate species

Sea level fingerprints (patterns of variation in sea level rise) calculated from GRACE satellite observations

NASA and UC Irvine researchers have detected sea level 'fingerprints': Patterns of sea level variability around the world due to changes in water storage from melting ice sheets and glaciers.

The skull after attached sandstone rock was partially removed at the Turkana Basin Insitute, near Lodwar, Kenya

Ancient infant ape skull sheds light on the ancestor of all humans and living apes By Michael PriceAug.

A 9.7-million-year-old discovery has left a team of German scientists scratching their heads. The teeth seem to belong to a species only known to have appeared in Africa several million years later.

A 9.7-million-year-old discovery has left a team of German scientists scratching their heads. The teeth seem to belong to a species only known to have appeared in Africa several million years later.

Archaeologists on Tuesday, September 19, 2017, announced the discovery of a boat-tomb under the market place of the Norwegian city of Trondheim, the former Nidaros founded by the Viking King Olaf Tryggvason in 997 and Norway's first capital .

Archaeologists excavating a market square in Trondheim, Norway, have discovered the remains of a boat grave and possible human remains dating to around the time the Vikings started exploring and raiding lands across Europe. The boat was at least.

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