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Slave Whip, National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Slave Whip, National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Nat Turner’s Bible, 1830s Bible owned by Nat Turner. Gift of Maurice A. Person and Noah and Brooke Porter

Photo: Century woodcut depiction of the Southampton Insurrection. On this day in Nat Turner, the notorious insurrectionist, began his rebellion.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture - STATUE OF CLARA BROWN After Brown was freed from slavery, she moved to Colorado, where she became an important community leader, helping other former slaves to settle there. The slave cabin to the right, from about 1853, had been on Edisto Island in South Carolina.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture

A curated walk through the hallways of the newest Smithsonian museum before it opens next week. 13 years in the making, it attempts to depict the pain and pride of the black experience in America.

In anticipation of its Fall 2016 opening, the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) did something beautiful.

In anticipation of its Fall 2016 opening, the Smithsonian& National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) did something beautiful.

Antietam National Battlefield - the location of the Bloodiest One Day Battle in American History. soldiers were killed, wounded or missing after 12 hours of combat on Sept. Antietam National Battlefield will observe the Anniversary of the battle Sept.

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin (8/31/1842 - 3/13/1924) was responsible for the merger of other African American women's organizations into the National Association of Colored Women in 1896. She had previously founded the American Woman Suffrage Association of Boston with Julia Ward Howe and Lucy Stone, and was a member of several other predominantly white women's organizations. Her husband, George Lewis Ruffin, was the first African American graduate of Harvard Law School. #TodayInBlackHistory

Pierre Ruffin (August 1842 - March was responsible for the merger of other African American women's organizati.

The first graves in Arlington National Cemetery were dug by James Parks, a former slave. Parks was freed in 1862 He still lived on Arlington Estate when Secretary of War Stanton signed the orders designating Arlington as a military burial ground. Parks worked as a grave digger and maintenance man for the cemetery. When he died on Aug. 21, 1929, Secretary of War Stimson granted special permission for him to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

The first graves in Arlington National Cemetery were dug by James Parks, a…

The National Museum of African American History and Culture - The New York Times

The National Museum of African American History and Culture

A curated walk through the hallways of the newest Smithsonian museum before it opens next week.

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