Daily shortread: Art and Death in the Middle Ages by Sigrid Goldiner, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. image: One of the carved arm rests of the stalls at the west end of the Beauchamp Chapel by Aidan McRae Thomson *In the ancient world, the mythical beasts called griffins were symbols of royalty and protectors of the dead. They continued to play these roles for Christians.

Daily shortread: Art and Death in the Middle Ages by Sigrid Goldiner, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. image: One of the carved arm rests of the stalls at the west end of the Beauchamp Chapel by Aidan McRae Thomson *In the ancient world, the mythical beasts called griffins were symbols of royalty and protectors of the dead. They continued to play these roles for Christians.

Love Tapestry; fragment; Basel c. 1450.

Love Tapestry; fragment; Basel c. 1450.

Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Cod. Min. 77, detail of f.11. Triumphzug Kaiser Maximilians I. 2nd half of the 16th century.

Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Cod. Min. 77, detail of f.11. Triumphzug Kaiser Maximilians I. 2nd half of the 16th century.

A Parthian bronze vessel with griffin spout. Circa 1st Century B.C. - 2nd Century A.D.

A Parthian bronze vessel with griffin spout. Circa 1st Century B.C. - 2nd Century A.D.

The red Griffin rampant was the coat of arms of the dukes of Pomerania and survives today as the armorial of West Pomeranian Voivodeship (historically, Farther Pomerania) in Poland.

The red Griffin rampant was the coat of arms of the dukes of Pomerania and survives today as the armorial of West Pomeranian Voivodeship (historically, Farther Pomerania) in Poland.

Roman gravestone.  For Ocellio, son of Illanuo,  his wife Exomna,  his daughter Optata  (and) his granddaughter Anna  Bienus, son of Gatus,  erected this stone in  grateful remembrance  at his own charge.

Roman gravestone. For Ocellio, son of Illanuo, his wife Exomna, his daughter Optata (and) his granddaughter Anna Bienus, son of Gatus, erected this stone in grateful remembrance at his own charge.

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