Explore Bottlenose Dolphin, Sunset and more!

Explore related topics

Bottlenose Dolphin,Sunset,Water,Search,Animals,People

Whales adopt deformed bottlenose dolphin :')

Whales Adopt Deformed Bottlenose Dolphin…

Here is an example of a dolphin experiencing what many underwater creatures, like the manta ray, experience when caught in fishing wire. | 16 Things We Can Learn From Giant Manta Rays

16 Things We Can Learn From Giant Manta Rays

Here is an example of a dolphin experiencing what many underwater creatures, like the manta ray, experience when caught in fishing wire. | 16 Things We Can Learn From Giant Manta Rays

The Dolphin Communication Project (DCP) is focused on the dual goals of scientific research and education: Guests will accompany DCP researcher Kelly Melillo-Sweeting in search of Atlantic spotted and common bottlenose dolphins.

The Dolphin Communication Project (DCP) is focused on the dual goals of scientific research and education: Guests will accompany DCP researcher Kelly Melillo-Sweeting in search of Atlantic spotted and common bottlenose dolphins.

How long do bottlenose dolphins live. Bottlenose dolphins generally go in gatherings of 10-25 people. Crowds of a few hundred have been accounted for in seaward locales

How long do bottlenose dolphins live. Bottlenose dolphins generally go in gatherings of 10-25 people. Crowds of a few hundred have been accounted for in seaward locales

"Researchers have learned that dolphins live in large, complex social groups in which individual dolphins form and switch alliances with other dolphins. Fieldworkers have even observed 'alliances of alliances,’ where one group of allies forms an alliance with another group of allies. These social groupings may be similar to the cliques people form. Dolphins and whales are multicultural, too. Different groups have different dialects and feeding and play behaviors." -- Temple Grandin

"Researchers have learned that dolphins live in large, complex social groups in which individual dolphins form and switch alliances with other dolphins. Fieldworkers have even observed 'alliances of alliances,’ where one group of allies forms an alliance with another group of allies. These social groupings may be similar to the cliques people form. Dolphins and whales are multicultural, too. Different groups have different dialects and feeding and play behaviors." -- Temple Grandin

Pinterest
Search