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NMVTI

NMVTI

UFO Billboard, Brewer, Maine, 1966 Photo via Professor Gort Collection

UFO Billboard, Brewer, Maine, 1966 Photo via Professor Gort Collection

The Soda Pops, Farmington State Normal School, 1930. Item # 72751 on Maine Memory Network

The Soda Pops, Farmington State Normal School, 1930. Item # 72751 on Maine Memory Network

FLAGSTAFF, Maine. The town was physically abandoned and dismantled (and legally dis-incorporated) in 1950 to allow construction of a hydroelectric dam on the Dead River, which enlarged Flagstaff Lake and submerged the site of the settlement.

FLAGSTAFF, Maine. The town was physically abandoned and dismantled (and legally dis-incorporated) in 1950 to allow construction of a hydroelectric dam on the Dead River, which enlarged Flagstaff Lake and submerged the site of the settlement.

historic maine photos | Caribou, Maine: Depression Era Photographs

historic maine photos | Caribou, Maine: Depression Era Photographs

Daewoocnh_kc135mooseisloose.jpg

Daewoocnh_kc135mooseisloose.jpg

Maine's anti-billboard law called for the phaseout of all commercial billboards by 1984. On December 23, 1980, the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the law, as written, was unconstitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court in 1981 upheld the right of cities or states to ban commercial billboards. Item # 5863 on Maine Memory Network

Maine's anti-billboard law called for the phaseout of all commercial billboards by 1984. On December 23, 1980, the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the law, as written, was unconstitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court in 1981 upheld the right of cities or states to ban commercial billboards. Item # 5863 on Maine Memory Network

Trade catalogs, due to their ephemeral, commonplace nature, are frequently overlooked as sources of information on American industrial, manufacturing, and merchandising history. Trade catalog scholar Lawrence Romaine asserts, “If a complete history of American manufacture is ever to be compiled, American trade catalogs will unquestionably be one of the most valuable sources of material available.”

Trade catalogs, due to their ephemeral, commonplace nature, are frequently overlooked as sources of information on American industrial, manufacturing, and merchandising history. Trade catalog scholar Lawrence Romaine asserts, “If a complete history of American manufacture is ever to be compiled, American trade catalogs will unquestionably be one of the most valuable sources of material available.”

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