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In this caricature  she is literally ‘being pilloried’ for her devotion to gaming at Faro (Lady Buckingham on the left, Lady Archer on the right). Entitled ‘Exaltation of Faro’s Daughters’ it shows a card reading “Cure for Gambling. Published by Lord Kenyon in the Court of Kings Bench May 9th 1796″. The cartoonist is of course James Gillray and appears courtesy of the the National Portrait Gallery.

In this caricature she is literally ‘being pilloried’ for her devotion to gaming at Faro (Lady Buckingham on the left, Lady Archer on the right). Entitled ‘Exaltation of Faro’s Daughters’ it shows a card reading “Cure for Gambling. Published by Lord Kenyon in the Court of Kings Bench May 9th 1796″. The cartoonist is of course James Gillray and appears courtesy of the the National Portrait Gallery.

A painting from around 1668 showing patrons of a London coffee house

World's most expensive coffee set to go under the hammer for £4.5MILLION

"The Hospital for Lunatics" by Thomas Rowlandson, 1789. Pitt, the Duke of Richmond and the Duchess of Gordon are shown as incurable lunatics. On Pitt's cell are the words "went mad supposing himself next heir to a Crown", a reference to the recent Regency Crisis.

"The Hospital for Lunatics" by Thomas Rowlandson, 1789. Pitt, the Duke of Richmond and the Duchess of Gordon are shown as incurable lunatics. On Pitt's cell are the words "went mad supposing himself next heir to a Crown", a reference to the recent Regency Crisis.

Some new medicines could also cause severe problems. Laudanum, for ex, which became popular as a medicine in Georgian times, is another name for opium. Laudanum was prescribed for all sorts of ailments – pain, sleeplessness, anxiety, and general ill-health. It must have been extremely effective in the short term; the long-term effect, however, was to turn patients into drug addicts. This image, however, is about the blue ruin (Gin).

Some new medicines could also cause severe problems. Laudanum, for ex, which became popular as a medicine in Georgian times, is another name for opium. Laudanum was prescribed for all sorts of ailments – pain, sleeplessness, anxiety, and general ill-health. It must have been extremely effective in the short term; the long-term effect, however, was to turn patients into drug addicts. This image, however, is about the blue ruin (Gin).

The rise and fall go Bagnigge Wells- popular Georgian watering hole. Blog post by Georgian Gent Mike Rendell.

The rise and fall go Bagnigge Wells- popular Georgian watering hole. Blog post by Georgian Gent Mike Rendell.

"The Assembly of Old Batchelors" by Louis-Pierre Boitard (1743) - "...perhaps the bachelors have had some hand in choosing their circumstances, rather than simply being left on the shelf. And that they're not talking politics at all, but more likely railing against marriage and I or lamenting their lost virility. They have actively eschewed the life of the honest husband for that of the old letch."

Old Maids & Old Bachelors: An Assembly of Undateables, 1743

"The Assembly of Old Batchelors" by Louis-Pierre Boitard (1743) - "...perhaps the bachelors have had some hand in choosing their circumstances, rather than simply being left on the shelf. And that they're not talking politics at all, but more likely railing against marriage and I or lamenting their lost virility. They have actively eschewed the life of the honest husband for that of the old letch."

Caricature of the Prince Regent and Mary Robinson, actress.The prince referred to her as “Perdita” and himself as “Florizel,” in the latter case referring to the prince in A Winter’s Tale who falls in love with Perdita. The press, which chronicled the relationship from its start, appropriated these names for their own use as well

Caricature of the Prince Regent and Mary Robinson, actress.The prince referred to her as “Perdita” and himself as “Florizel,” in the latter case referring to the prince in A Winter’s Tale who falls in love with Perdita. The press, which chronicled the relationship from its start, appropriated these names for their own use as well

"English Curiosity, or the Foreigner Stared out of Countenance" by Thomas Rowlandson (1784) in the Royal Collection, UK - From the curators' comments: "A hand-coloured print of an colourfully dressed foreign gentleman seated within a box at the theatre. Other theatre-goers all stare at the man who wears a fur hat, red cloak and sword."

"English Curiosity, or the Foreigner Stared out of Countenance" by Thomas Rowlandson (1784) in the Royal Collection, UK - From the curators' comments: "A hand-coloured print of an colourfully dressed foreign gentleman seated within a box at the theatre. Other theatre-goers all stare at the man who wears a fur hat, red cloak and sword."

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