Most of the sounds we humans hear are detected by the cochlea, a relatively new development in evolutionary terms. Nevertheless, the otolith organs inherited from our pre-mammalian ancestors may continue to play a role in human hearing, as well as balance, particularly for sensing vibration and rhythm. Illustration by Emma Skurnick.  #hearing #human #ears #science #biology #evolution

Most of the sounds we humans hear are detected by the cochlea, a relatively new development in evolutionary terms. Nevertheless, the otolith organs inherited from our pre-mammalian ancestors may continue to play a role in human hearing, as well as balance, particularly for sensing vibration and rhythm. Illustration by Emma Skurnick. #hearing #human #ears #science #biology #evolution

This abridged version of the family tree of more than 450 mantis shrimp species shows that smashers evolved from spearer-like ancestors. Ancient mantis shrimp fossils also had raptorial appendages. Understanding the diversity and evolution of mantis shrimp appendages lends insight into the costs and benefits to moving ultrafast.  Figure adapted from T. Claverie and S. N. Patek, 2013.  #mantisshrimp #organisms #biology #appendages #animals #fastanimals #science

This abridged version of the family tree of more than 450 mantis shrimp species shows that smashers evolved from spearer-like ancestors. Ancient mantis shrimp fossils also had raptorial appendages. Understanding the diversity and evolution of mantis shrimp appendages lends insight into the costs and benefits to moving ultrafast. Figure adapted from T. Claverie and S. N. Patek, 2013. #mantisshrimp #organisms #biology #appendages #animals #fastanimals #science

"How Tunas and Lamnid Sharks Swim: An Evolutionary Convergence"  These fishes diverged millions of years ago, but selection pressures have brought them very similar biomechanical schemes for movement.  Read More: http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/how-tunas-and-lamnid-sharks-swim-an-evolutionary-convergence  Nov. & Dec. 2005, illustrated by Barbara Aulicino  #fish #tuna #swim #evolution #science

"How Tunas and Lamnid Sharks Swim: An Evolutionary Convergence" These fishes diverged millions of years ago, but selection pressures have brought them very similar biomechanical schemes for movement. Read More: http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/how-tunas-and-lamnid-sharks-swim-an-evolutionary-convergence Nov. & Dec. 2005, illustrated by Barbara Aulicino #fish #tuna #swim #evolution #science

For a mandala portraying the evolution of the human head, facial features, and senses, Babaian consults a phylogenetic tree showing the temporal distribution of human ancestors. Photograph by Story Biddle.  #artist #biology #womeninSTEM #science #mandala #ecosystem #chalk

For a mandala portraying the evolution of the human head, facial features, and senses, Babaian consults a phylogenetic tree showing the temporal distribution of human ancestors. Photograph by Story Biddle. #artist #biology #womeninSTEM #science #mandala #ecosystem #chalk

The movement of the smashing mantis shrimp’s appendage (top panel) causes the water around it to move so quickly that low pressure creates vapor bubbles that then collapse, emitting energy in the form of light and heat.   #cavitation #mantisshrimp #physics #science #fastanimals #biology

The movement of the smashing mantis shrimp’s appendage (top panel) causes the water around it to move so quickly that low pressure creates vapor bubbles that then collapse, emitting energy in the form of light and heat. #cavitation #mantisshrimp #physics #science #fastanimals #biology

Noise induced hearing losses-Illustration showing The auditory system in the ear.

Noise induced hearing losses-Illustration showing The auditory system in the ear.

Harbor porpoises use structures called phonic lips to create clicks. The fatty, rounded tissue called the melon serves to focus the porpoise’s signal into a narrow beam. The returned echoes are funneled through fat channels to the middle and inner ears. The latter are located in bony capsules separate from the skull, to aid in locating the direction of sounds.  www.amsci.org/issues/feature/2015/1/the-acoustic-world-of-harbor-porpoises  Illustration by Tom Dunne  #porpoise #biology #science

Harbor porpoises use structures called phonic lips to create clicks. The fatty, rounded tissue called the melon serves to focus the porpoise’s signal into a narrow beam. The returned echoes are funneled through fat channels to the middle and inner ears. The latter are located in bony capsules separate from the skull, to aid in locating the direction of sounds. www.amsci.org/issues/feature/2015/1/the-acoustic-world-of-harbor-porpoises Illustration by Tom Dunne #porpoise #biology #science

In some cases a child’s lie may have more than one motive. Here, the child who denies he is responsible for the broken vase aims to accomplish two things at once: to protect himself from punishment and to make his younger sibling feel shame (falsely) for an act of mischief.  Illustration by Tom Dunne.  http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/2015/2/origins-of-lying-and-deception/99999  #Children #Kids #Lying #Psychology #Science

In some cases a child’s lie may have more than one motive. Here, the child who denies he is responsible for the broken vase aims to accomplish two things at once: to protect himself from punishment and to make his younger sibling feel shame (falsely) for an act of mischief. Illustration by Tom Dunne. http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/2015/2/origins-of-lying-and-deception/99999 #Children #Kids #Lying #Psychology #Science

Adventures in Mathematical Knitting  Rendering mathematical surfaces and objects in tactile form requires both time and creativity

Adventures in Mathematical Knitting Rendering mathematical surfaces and objects in tactile form requires both time and creativity

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