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Suushi_Inugami
Find this Pin and more on Hyakkai-Zukan by alejandraviart.
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犬神『百怪図巻』佐脇嵩之 Inugami, dog god, is the name of a fictious being from japanese mythology, which is similiar to the Shikigami and who belongs to the range of the spirits, the Kami.

The inugami as depicted in Sawaki Suushi’s Hyakkai-Zukan, c.

Edo-period monster paintings by Sawaki Suushi

Picture of an inugami. Japanese Yokai: folklore creatures in Edo era art

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Japanese mythical creature is the nuppeppo, which appear to be an animated lump of human flesh and fats with a horrible body odor. This blob seems to have a face and some semblance of fingers and toes. Nuppeppo are considered harmless and are thought to roam around empty streets at night, or in abandoned temples or cemeteries. You may remember one in Hayao Miyazaki’s breakthrough film Spirited Away. Darn it, they look almost cute and pathetic, lulling us into a false sense of security
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Japanese folklore is full of yōkai, or supernatural monsters, who vary from the shy and humanlike to the malevolent and beyond strange.

Japanese mythical creature is the nuppeppo, which appear to be an animated lump of human flesh and fats with a horrible body odor. This blob seems to have a face and some semblance of fingers and toes. Nuppeppo are considered harmless and are thought to roam around empty streets at night, or in abandoned temples or cemeteries. You may remember one in Hayao Miyazaki’s breakthrough film Spirited Away. Darn it, they look almost cute and pathetic, lulling us into a false sense of security

Japanese mythical creature is the nuppeppo, which appear to be an animated lump of human flesh and fats with a horrible body odor. This blob seems to have a face and some semblance of fingers and toes. Nuppeppo are considered harmless and are thought to roam around empty streets at night, or in abandoned temples or cemeteries. You may remember one in Hayao Miyazaki’s breakthrough film Spirited Away. Darn it, they look almost cute and pathetic, lulling us into a false sense of security
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Hitotsume-nyudo / One-eyed priest from 僧形の化物 / Sogyo-no-bakemono / Monster scroll by Sogyo(?)
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Hitotsume-nyudo / One-eyed priest from 僧形の化物 / Sogyo-no-bakemono / Monster scroll by Sogyo(?)

Hitotsume-nyudo / One-eyed priest from 僧形の化物 / Sogyo-no-bakemono / Monster scroll by Sogyo(?)
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Ao bōzu, Yokai: Ao bōzu are generally depicted as large, one-eyed, blue-skinned priests with a strong connection to magic. However, local accounts vary greatly in details such as size, number of eyes, and habitat. In Okayama, they are described as two-eyed giants who take up residence in abandoned or uninhabited homes. In other stories, they appear in wheat fields, or on dark, lonely roads.
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Hyakkai Zukan by Sawaki Suushi

Hyakkai-Zukan, The Illustrated Volume of a Hundred Demons.

Ao bōzu, Yokai: Ao bōzu are generally depicted as large, one-eyed, blue-skinned priests with a strong connection to magic. However, local accounts vary greatly in details such as size, number of eyes, and habitat. In Okayama, they are described as two-eyed giants who take up residence in abandoned or uninhabited homes. In other stories, they appear in wheat fields, or on dark, lonely roads.

Ao bōzu, Yokai: Ao bōzu are generally depicted as large, one-eyed, blue-skinned priests with a strong connection to magic. However, local accounts vary greatly in details such as size, number of eyes, and habitat. In Okayama, they are described as two-eyed giants who take up residence in abandoned or uninhabited homes. In other stories, they appear in wheat fields, or on dark, lonely roads.
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10 Japanese Monsters That Will Kill You - Listverse

When it comes to the creatures of Japanese mythology, everyone knows the strange and absurd monsters, from the kappa to the kasa-obake.

Halloween is all about spooky stuff, right? There are various bone-chilling tales coming out of medieval Europe for its origins – the dead returning, devils punishing Irishmen, ghosts, spooks…

Mythical and supernatural creatures from traditional folklore are associated with Halloween.

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tucec9: 濡女
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sinlesss: “ In Japanese folklore, a nure-onna resembles an amphibious creature with the head of a woman and the body of a snake. While the description of her appearance varies slightly from story to.

The snake woman pictured here was reportedly encountered by six people on Mt…

A great task is accomplished by a series of small acts.

tucec9: 濡女

tucec9: 濡女

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Nuribotoke (an animated corpse with blackened flesh and dangling eyeballs) from the Hyakkai-Zukan, Sawaki Suushi, 1737

Sawaki Suushi Hyakkai Zukkan (The Illustrated Volume of a Hundred Demons) 1737 “Hyakkai-Zukan is a collection of picture scrolls by Edo Period Japanese artist Sawaki Suushi.

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Rokurokubi are demons found in Japanese folklore. They look like normal human beings by day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths. They can also change their faces to those of terrifying oni to better scare mortals.

“The Kaibutsu Ehon (“Illustrated Book of Monsters”) features woodblock prints of yōkai, or creatures from Japanese folklore. - Futsukeshibaba (a.k.a. Hikeshibaba) - Mysterious old woman in white who extinguishes lanterns

Futsukeshibaba or Hikeshibaba from "The Kaibutsu Ehon" ("Illustrated Book of Monsters"), 1881 by Nabeta Gyokuei

五体面(ごたいめん)は、熊本県八代市の松井文庫が所蔵する妖怪絵巻『百鬼夜行絵巻』(尾田郷澄・1832年)などに描かれている日本の妖怪。百鬼夜行絵巻 (松井文庫)

五体面(ごたいめん)は、熊本県八代市の松井文庫が所蔵する妖怪絵巻『百鬼夜行絵巻』(尾田郷澄・1832年)などに描かれている日本の妖怪。百鬼夜行絵巻 (松井文庫)

Raiju Mythology | Raiju is a legendary creature in Japanese mythology. Its name ...

Raiju is a legendary creature in Japanese mythology. Its name translates to “thunder beast” in English. Raiju has a body composed of either fire or.

ぬらりひょん『暁斎百鬼画談』河鍋暁斎 Nurarihyon from “Kyosai's One Hundred Scary Illustrated Tales”, KAWANABE Kyosai

ぬらりひょん『暁斎百鬼画談』河鍋暁斎 Nurarihyon from “Kyosai's One Hundred Scary Illustrated Tales”, KAWANABE Kyosai

かさねのぼうこん / Kasane no Boukon, ca. 1847-1852 by Utagawa Kuniyoshi || Note that female Kasane ghost’s face is depicted using a collage of images of human bodies in various forms, as well as tools.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi Ghost of Kasane (Kasane no boukon, かさねのぼうこん) (censors Mera and Murata) NOTE: The ghost’s face is made up of body parts and tools.

In the sophisticated popular culture of the Edo period (1603-1868), much attention was devoted to Japan's rich pantheon of traditional monsters and apparitions, known as yokai. (another great article from pink tentacle)

Another monster monk is Mikoshi-nyudo (a. Miage-nyudo), a large, cross-eyed mendicant encountered on mountain passes or on lonely roads at night. Mikoshi-nyudo grows taller when you look up at him -- and the higher you look, the taller he grows.

Mikoshi-nyūdō -- Monk-like creature that grows taller the more you look at it

見越入道 Mikoshi-nyūdō, monk-like creature that grows taller the more you look at it, from “Illustrated Book of Monsters”, NABETA Gyokuei『怪物画本』(鳥山石燕を模写)鍋田玉英, 1881

ancient japanese art - Google Search

“Jiuwei Hu, also called Huli jing (fox spirits) in Chinese, is a monster in Chinese Mythology. It is a fox-like monster with four legs and nine tails and its whole body was covered with fiery hair.

Onryo  Onryo are female ghosts that were abused or neglected by their lovers. They dwell in the physical world after death seeking vengeance. Powerless in life they become strong in death. Strangely enough they rarely harm the lovers who vexed them.

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