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Cecil Beaton portrait of an Indian nurse at an ARP First Aid Post in Calcutta, WWII. Collection of the Imperial War Museum, London

Cecil Beaton portrait of an Indian nurse at an ARP First Aid Post in Calcutta, WWII. Collection of the Imperial War Museum, London

STUDENT NURSE: LIFE AT ST HELIER HOSPITAL, CARSHALTON, SURREY, 1943

STUDENT NURSE: LIFE AT ST HELIER HOSPITAL, CARSHALTON, SURREY, 1943

FROM THE WOMEN AT WAR 1939-1945 (TR 2162) COLLECTIONS, IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM, LONDON

FROM THE WOMEN AT WAR 1939-1945 (TR 2162) COLLECTIONS, IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM, LONDON

Lilian Wald, founder of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For more historical photographs, see https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.447468683338.240730.99588788338

Lilian Wald, founder of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For more historical photographs, see https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.447468683338.240730.99588788338

1941: Betty Quinn, 17, the youngest recipient of the George Medal, at the Investiture Ceremony at Buckingham Palace, London. She saved seven people from a bombed air raid shelter while serving as an ARP Warden in Coventry. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

1941: Betty Quinn, 17, the youngest recipient of the George Medal, at the Investiture Ceremony at Buckingham Palace, London. She saved seven people from a bombed air raid shelter while serving as an ARP Warden in Coventry. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

Margaret (Peggy) Campbell wears the starched veil and brass-buttoned uniform of a Canadian nursing sister, one of nearly 5,000 nurses who served with Canadas armed services during World War II.

Canadian nurse survived close calls, cared for wounded in World War II (video)

Margaret (Peggy) Campbell wears the starched veil and brass-buttoned uniform of a Canadian nursing sister, one of nearly 5,000 nurses who served with Canadas armed services during World War II.

In 1914 an 18-year-old girl called Mairi Chisholm set out for London on her motor bike to see how she could help the war effort. She teamed up with a nurse called Elsie Knocker, who shared her spirit of adventure, and the pair of them went on to spend an incredible four years treating the wounded on the front line. They were the only women to live and work in the Belgian front-line trenches during the First World War.

In 1914 an 18-year-old girl called Mairi Chisholm set out for London on her motor bike to see how she could help the war effort. She teamed up with a nurse called Elsie Knocker, who shared her spirit of adventure, and the pair of them went on to spend an incredible four years treating the wounded on the front line. They were the only women to live and work in the Belgian front-line trenches during the First World War.

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