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ქართველების ინსტაგრამი » ANGEL.GE

ქართველების ინსტაგრამი » ANGEL.GE

Prt2: 6) The Georgian people are from the indigenous Caucasian ethnic race. It is believed that they have been in Georgia and Caucasus since the Neolithic period.

Prt2: 6) The Georgian people are from the indigenous Caucasian ethnic race. It is believed that they have been in Georgia and Caucasus since the Neolithic period.

Khevsur Tunic, from Khevsureti, in North Georgia -Khevsureti is an historical-ethnographic region in eastern Georgia. The Khevsur are the branch of Kartvelian (Georgian) people located along both the northern and southern slopes of the Caucasus mountains.

Khevsur Tunic, from Khevsureti, in North Georgia -Khevsureti is an historical-ethnographic region in eastern Georgia. The Khevsur are the branch of Kartvelian (Georgian) people located along both the northern and southern slopes of the Caucasus mountains.

Vardzia Cave – Located at the European country of Georgia. -  Georgian people built this monastery in the Caucasus in the 12th century, for their impressive queen Tamar.

Vardzia Cave – Located at the European country of Georgia. - Georgian people built this monastery in the Caucasus in the 12th century, for their impressive queen Tamar.

The Deda Ena Statue in Tbilisi. April 14 is the Day of the Mother Tongue – Georgian language – in Georgia. On 14 April 1978 the Georgian people protested against the decision of the central soviet authorities to revoke the status of Georgian (as one of the minor languages in the Soviet Union) as a state language and replace it with Russian. Moscow withdrew its decision following the mass protest.

The Deda Ena Statue in Tbilisi. April 14 is the Day of the Mother Tongue – Georgian language – in Georgia. On 14 April 1978 the Georgian people protested against the decision of the central soviet authorities to revoke the status of Georgian (as one of the minor languages in the Soviet Union) as a state language and replace it with Russian. Moscow withdrew its decision following the mass protest.

The Deda Ena Statue in Tbilisi. April 14 is the Day of the Mother Tongue – Georgian language – in Georgia. On 14 April 1978 the Georgian people protested against the decision of the central soviet authorities to revoke the status of Georgian (as one of the minor languages in the Soviet Union) as a state language and replace it with Russian. Moscow withdrew its decision following the mass protest.

The Deda Ena Statue in Tbilisi. April 14 is the Day of the Mother Tongue – Georgian language – in Georgia. On 14 April 1978 the Georgian people protested against the decision of the central soviet authorities to revoke the status of Georgian (as one of the minor languages in the Soviet Union) as a state language and replace it with Russian. Moscow withdrew its decision following the mass protest.

The Deda Ena Statue in Tbilisi. April 14 is the Day of the Mother Tongue – Georgian language – in Georgia. On 14 April 1978 the Georgian people protested against the decision of the central soviet authorities to revoke the status of Georgian (as one of the minor languages in the Soviet Union) as a state language and replace it with Russian. Moscow withdrew its decision following the mass protest.

The Deda Ena Statue in Tbilisi. April 14 is the Day of the Mother Tongue – Georgian language – in Georgia. On 14 April 1978 the Georgian people protested against the decision of the central soviet authorities to revoke the status of Georgian (as one of the minor languages in the Soviet Union) as a state language and replace it with Russian. Moscow withdrew its decision following the mass protest.

You see, there are actually three different alphabets, or scripts, used to write the Georgian language: Asomtavruli, Nuskhuri, and Mkhedruli. The latter, Mkhedruli, is the one that is taken as the standard for writing in Georgia. The Georgian Scripts are so important to the history of the Georgian people that the United Nations are even considering them for inclusion in the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage List.

You see, there are actually three different alphabets, or scripts, used to write the Georgian language: Asomtavruli, Nuskhuri, and Mkhedruli. The latter, Mkhedruli, is the one that is taken as the standard for writing in Georgia. The Georgian Scripts are so important to the history of the Georgian people that the United Nations are even considering them for inclusion in the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage List.

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