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A plain silk miyamairi kimono used for christening a baby boy at a Shinto ceremony, featuring various yuzen-dyed ‘karako’ figures.  Mid-to late Meiji Period (1880-1911), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery.

A plain silk miyamairi kimono used for christening a baby boy at a Shinto ceremony, featuring various yuzen-dyed ‘karako’ figures. Mid-to late Meiji Period (1880-1911), Japan. The Kimono Gallery.

Lake / Fukumi Shimura Tokyo National Museum of light  "spinning cage" than (Motomeryudo / 2015 spring will be released)  Fukumi Shimura's kimono,  was dyed with vegetable dyes  have been woven in silk Tsumugiito (Tsumugiito).

Lake / Fukumi Shimura Tokyo National Museum of light "spinning cage" than (Motomeryudo / 2015 spring will be released) Fukumi Shimura's kimono, was dyed with vegetable dyes have been woven in silk Tsumugiito (Tsumugiito).

Silk oiran uchikake (in this case, not a wedding kimono) dating to the late 19th century, Japan.  Surviving oiran kimono are very rare

Silk oiran uchikake (in this case, not a wedding kimono) dating to the late 19th century, Japan. Surviving oiran kimono are very rare

Woman’s Summer Kimono (Katabira) with Pine, Fishing Nets, and Dragonflies, early Meiji period (1868-1912), first half of 19th century

Woman’s Summer Kimono (Katabira) with Pine, Fishing Nets, and Dragonflies, early Meiji period (1868-1912), first half of 19th century

Blue Irotomesode, Late Meiji (1880-1911). A silk irotomesode featuring large elegant cranes above a swirling ocean.The Kimono Gallery

Blue Irotomesode, Late Meiji (1880-1911). A silk irotomesode featuring large elegant cranes above a swirling ocean.The Kimono Gallery

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