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Water and Power Associates

Water and Power Associates

A 1931 view of the Figueroa Street Tunnels, shortly after the first three opened to traffic.

A 1931 view of the Figueroa Street Tunnels, shortly after the first three opened to traffic.

Water and Power Associates

Water and Power Associates

Water and Power Associates

Water and Power Associates

The original Route 66 bridge over Pryor Creek, built in 1926; by 1932, it had been replaced with a new bridge (right) on a straighter, wider alignment that still carries westbound Route 66 traffic.

The original Route 66 bridge over Pryor Creek, built in 1926; by 1932, it had been replaced with a new bridge (right) on a straighter, wider alignment that still carries westbound Route 66 traffic.

Figueroa Street tunnels

Figueroa Street tunnels

The Figueroa Street tunnels under construction, 1930. These tunnels now house the northbound lanes of the Arroyo Parkway.

The Figueroa Street tunnels under construction, 1930. These tunnels now house the northbound lanes of the Arroyo Parkway.

On Route 66 in Holbrook, AZ,, Joe and Aggie's Cafe has been there since the early '40's. Wonderful, friendly service and good food. Still family owned

Joe and Aggies Cafe, Route 66, Holbrook, Arizona

On Route 66 in Holbrook, AZ,, Joe and Aggie's Cafe has been there since the early '40's. Wonderful, friendly service and good food. Still family owned

A residential strip demolished to build the 405 Freeway. This 1957 view is to the south. The two streets paralleling the demolition zone are Cotner on the left and Beloit on the right. The first foreground cross-street is Ohio, and the diagonal street two blocks south is a remarkably quiet Santa Monica Boulevard. The big white, two-story building at the lower left is Verizon today. It is painfully obvious from this picture how freeways permanently divide neighborhoods.

A residential strip demolished to build the 405 Freeway. This 1957 view is to the south. The two streets paralleling the demolition zone are Cotner on the left and Beloit on the right. The first foreground cross-street is Ohio, and the diagonal street two blocks south is a remarkably quiet Santa Monica Boulevard. The big white, two-story building at the lower left is Verizon today. It is painfully obvious from this picture how freeways permanently divide neighborhoods.

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