Mary McLeod Bethune  Born on July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina, Mary McLeod Bethune was a child of former slaves. She graduated from the Scotia Seminary for Girls in 1893. Believing that education provided the key to racial advancement, Bethune founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute in 1904, which later became Bethune-Cookman College. She founded the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. Bethune died in 1955.

Mary McLeod Bethune Born on July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina, Mary McLeod Bethune was a child of former slaves. She graduated from the Scotia Seminary for Girls in 1893. Believing that education provided the key to racial advancement, Bethune founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute in 1904, which later became Bethune-Cookman College. She founded the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. Bethune died in 1955.

The widow and son of Medgar Evers on the cover of Life magazine

The Way We Were: Life Magazine Photos Of Women In The 1960s

Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom including Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Eugene Carson Blake, Martin Luther King, Floyd McKissick, Matthew Ahmann & John Lewis lead a procession.  (Photo by Robert W. Kelley/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom including Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Eugene Carson Blake, Martin Luther King, Floyd McKissick, Matthew Ahmann & John Lewis lead a procession. (Photo by Robert W. Kelley/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Brown Girl Collective Linda Brown and her Sister Walking to School, Topeka, Kansas, March 1953. Photo by Carl Iwaski.  On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled on Oliver Brown et al. v. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas and ended legal public-school segregation in the United States. This case was named for the fourth-grader Linda Brown--seen here at age ten, with her sister Terry Lynn, age six. Under segregation laws they were not allowed to attend the nearby New Summer School.

Brown Girl Collective Linda Brown and her Sister Walking to School, Topeka, Kansas, March 1953. Photo by Carl Iwaski. On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled on Oliver Brown et al. v. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas and ended legal public-school segregation in the United States. This case was named for the fourth-grader Linda Brown--seen here at age ten, with her sister Terry Lynn, age six. Under segregation laws they were not allowed to attend the nearby New Summer School.

Garrett T. Morgan, Inventor of the gas mask, rescued six people from a gas-filled tunnel in Cleveland, Ohio (July, 25,1916)

Garrett T. Morgan, Inventor of the gas mask, rescued six people from a gas-filled tunnel in Cleveland, Ohio (July, 25,1916)

Brown Girl Collective 2 hrs ·  Brown Girl Herstory: On February 12, 2009, Atlantic Southeast created aviation history by having the first all female African American crew in United States history. Flight 5202 departed Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International en route to Nashville International with Captain Rachelle Jones and First Officer Stephanie Grant at the controls, and Flight Attendants Diana Galloway and Robin Rogers taking care of the passengers' needs.

Brown Girl Collective 2 hrs · Brown Girl Herstory: On February 12, 2009, Atlantic Southeast created aviation history by having the first all female African American crew in United States history. Flight 5202 departed Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International en route to Nashville International with Captain Rachelle Jones and First Officer Stephanie Grant at the controls, and Flight Attendants Diana Galloway and Robin Rogers taking care of the passengers' needs.

"Until the killing of black men, black mothers’ sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother’s son, we who believe in freedom cannot rest until this happens." ~ Ella Baker (1903 - 1986), 1964

"Until the killing of black men, black mothers’ sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother’s son, we who believe in freedom cannot rest until this happens." ~ Ella Baker (1903 - 1986), 1964

Richard Theodore Greener (1844-1922) was the first Black graduate of Harvard University (Class of 1870). His papers, including his Harvard diploma, his law license, photos and papers connected to his diplomatic role in Russia and his friendship with President Ulysses S. Grant, were recently discovered in an attic on the South Side of Chicago - just before the house was demolished.

Richard Theodore Greener (1844-1922) was the first Black graduate of Harvard University (Class of 1870). His papers, including his Harvard diploma, his law license, photos and papers connected to his diplomatic role in Russia and his friendship with President Ulysses S. Grant, were recently discovered in an attic on the South Side of Chicago - just before the house was demolished.

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