Explore Big Al, Wyoming and more!

With many of our diggers arriving today, we didn’t have time to go out to the site to dig. Instead, we went for a quick look at the Big Al Quarry. “Big Al” is a nearly complete Allosaurus that was discovered in 1991 and excavated by the Museum of the Rockies and the University of Wyoming Geological Museum; a cast of “Big Al” is on permanent exhibit at VMNH (above).

With many of our diggers arriving today, we didn’t have time to go out to the site to dig. Instead, we went for a quick look at the Big Al Quarry. “Big Al” is a nearly complete Allosaurus that was discovered in 1991 and excavated by the Museum of the Rockies and the University of Wyoming Geological Museum; a cast of “Big Al” is on permanent exhibit at VMNH (above).

Immediately above the Morrison is the Pryor Conglomerate, a sandstone-to-conglomerate that in this area is often a resistant unit forming benches or ledges (arrow, below):

Wyoming Day 2 – Mesozoic stratigraphy

Immediately above the Morrison is the Pryor Conglomerate, a sandstone-to-conglomerate that in this area is often a resistant unit forming benches or ledges (arrow, below):

The Pryor is the lowest member of the Cretaceous Cloverly Formation, which like the Morrison is mostly fluvial and terrestrial in origin (both dinosaurs and terrestrial plants have been reported). It contains at least one tuff (a volcanic ash deposit), and numerous bright red paleosols:

Wyoming Day 2 – Mesozoic stratigraphy

The Pryor is the lowest member of the Cretaceous Cloverly Formation, which like the Morrison is mostly fluvial and terrestrial in origin (both dinosaurs and terrestrial plants have been reported). It contains at least one tuff (a volcanic ash deposit), and numerous bright red paleosols:

Above the Sundance is the Morrison Formation (below, in the Coyote Basin), famous for its dinosaurs. This is the unit we’re excavating at Two Sisters. The Morrison is largely made up of terrestrial and fluvial sediments (sediments deposited by rivers), so the nature of the sediments can change quite a bit from place to place.

Wyoming Day 2 – Mesozoic stratigraphy

Above the Sundance is the Morrison Formation (below, in the Coyote Basin), famous for its dinosaurs. This is the unit we’re excavating at Two Sisters. The Morrison is largely made up of terrestrial and fluvial sediments (sediments deposited by rivers), so the nature of the sediments can change quite a bit from place to place.

Finally, above the Cloverly is the mostly marine Thermopolis Shale, which is also Cretaceous (you can see the red and yellow Cloverly near the bottom of the picture):

Wyoming Day 2 – Mesozoic stratigraphy

Finally, above the Cloverly is the mostly marine Thermopolis Shale, which is also Cretaceous (you can see the red and yellow Cloverly near the bottom of the picture):

Here’s the Pryor up close, showing prominent cross-bedding:

Wyoming Day 2 – Mesozoic stratigraphy

Here’s the Pryor up close, showing prominent cross-bedding:

An Exposure of the New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian), the North Vernon and Jeffersonville Limestones (Devonian), and the Louisville Member of the Pleasant Mills Formation (Silurian) in an abandoned quarry in the southwestern part of Clark Military Grant 131, 1.0 mile northeast of Speed in Clark County, Indiana.

The Indiana Geological Survey: The resource for geological information in the state of Indiana.

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Image result for horse creek wyoming

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