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News about the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill. Commentary and archival information about Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill from The New York Times.

The Mauve Stinger  Jellyfish

tentacle garden The Mauve Stinger (Pelagia Noctiluca) ~ Literally, the sea-swimming nightlight.

Siphonophore.  Among the more important predators of midwater habitats in Monterey Bay and elsewhere are the members of the Subclass Siphonophorae.   Whether siphonophores are single individuals or colonies of well-integrated polymorphic hydroid and medusoid individuals is a matter of debate among specialists.

Related to the jellyfish and corals, Siphonophore is a continuous chain of specialized polyps - individual animals that grow from one another in an organized colony. Some in the colony are devoted to feeding, armed with stinging cells to snag fish or in

Kyanite, whose name derives from the Greek word kuanos sometimes referred to as "kyanos", meaning deep blue, is a typically blue silicate mineral, commonly found inaluminium-rich metamorphic pegmatitesand/or sedimentary rock. Kyanite inmetamorphic rocks generally indicates pressures higher than four kilobars. Although potentially stable at lower pressure and low temperature, the activity of water is usually high enough under such conditions that it is replaced by hydrous aluminosilicates…

Kyanite, whose name derives from the Greek word kuanos sometimes referred to as "kyanos", meaning deep blue, is a typically blue silicate mineral, commonly found inaluminium-rich metamorphic pegmatitesand/or sedimentary rock. Kyanite inmetamorphic rocks generally indicates pressures higher than four kilobars. Although potentially stable at lower pressure and low temperature, the activity of water is usually high enough under such conditions that it is replaced by hydrous aluminosilicates…

Ringwoodite: The waterlogged mineral hidden deep in the Earth

The waterlogged mineral hidden deep in the Earth

Earth mantle rock Ringwoodite (high pressure polymorph of olivine) contains enough hydroxide ions to suggest there is from one to three world ocean's equivalent of fresh water in the mantle transition zone from 410 to 660 km deep

The brownish gem – bought for about $20 but of inestimable scientific value – has given researchers the first ever terrestrial sample of a rare mineral known as ringwoodite - the highest pressure high-pressure polymorph of olivine currently known to exist.

A diamond from Juína, Brazil, containing a water-rich inclusion of the olivine mineral ringwoodite. A battered diamond that survived a trip from "hell" confirms a long-held theory: Earth's mantle holds an ocean's worth of water.

Mineral hints at oceans of water below the earth's crust, in the upper mantle. Pict: Ringwoodite containing 1.5% water

Hints of deep Earth's blue rocks

Ringwoodite Minerals preserved in diamond have revealed hints of the bright blue rocks that exist deep within the Earth. They also provide the first direct evidence that there may be as much water trapped in those rocks as there is in all the oceans.

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