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Irish Rail Celebrates 1916 and The Future - DublinTown

Irish women were not cowering at home, invisible, as war broke out. They  actively responded,  whether fighting, supporting their families or coming to the aid of victims

Nurse Elizabeth O’Farrell accompanied Patrick Pearse when he surrendered to the British at the end of the Easter Rising, but her feet are often airbrushed out, symbolic of how the contribution of Irish women have been written out of our history

A scene from the Easter Rising in Dublin 1916. Photograph: Hulton Getty

In an attempt to help their families, anyway they can, these children who live in horribly poor conditions resort to gathering firewood and other materials from this obliterated and dangerous building site in the Easter Rising.

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Richmond Barracks Exhibition Centre explores the Irishwoman’s Council and the 1916 Easter Rising

British officer opening fire at protestors during the Irish riots, following the Easter Rising Rebellions, Dublin, Ireland, 1916-1920.

British officer opening fire at protestors during the Irish riots, following the Easter Rising Rebellions, Dublin, Ireland, 1916-1920.

The remains of the Dublin Bread Company building after the 1916 Rising.

The remains of the Dublin Bread Company building after the 1916 Rising.

Tumult: rebel prisoners in Dublin after the Easter Rising of 1916. Photograph: Photo12/UIG via Getty The Nobel laureate’s early enthusiasm for a brave old world of glorious Celtic warriors ended in postwar disillusion and disgust.

The Nobel laureate’s early enthusiasm for a brave old world of glorious Celtic warriors ended in postwar disillusion and disgust

Easter rising.

British soldiers rest after battle of Mount St Easter Rising 1916

1916 Print Series - Margaret Skinnider | Royal Irish Academy

1916 Print Series - Margaret Skinnider | Royal Irish Academy

Easter 1916: part of David Rooney’s illustration of Edward Daly

Artist David Rooney explains the poster published with this weekend’s ‘Irish Times’

Margaret Skinnider (28 May 1892 – 10 October 1971) was a revolutionary and feminist born in Coatbridge, Scotland. She fought during the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin. Her part in the Easter Rising was all the more notable because she was a woman, a sniper and the only female wounded in the action. She was mentioned three times for bravery in the dispatches sent to the Dublin GPO.[

Margaret Skinnider served as a scout, despatch-rider, sniper and raider. She told of hair-raising experiences as she served Commandant Michael Mallin near Grafton Street, during the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin.

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Battalion RDF during the Easter Rising

Pupils of St Enda’s enacting the pageant The Coming of Fionn. MacNeill actively supported Pearse’s independent boys’ school, intended to be a training ground for future generations of nationalists as well as a radical experiment in alternative education. (Pearse Museum)

Eoin MacNeill was above all a scholar, a historian of early and medieval Ireland, and an Irish linguist. His call for Irish nationalists to establish a militia in imitation …

A rare photograph of Enniscorthy Irish Volunteers taken prior to their surrender during the 1916 Rising. Inscribed in pencil on mount,  'Enniscorthy May 1st 1916'. Included in the portrait is Volunteer commander Robert Brennan and other Volunteers.

A rare photograph of Enniscorthy Irish Volunteers taken prior to their surrender during the 1916 Rising. Inscribed in pencil on mount, 'Enniscorthy May Included in the portrait is Volunteer commander Robert Brennan and other Volunteers.

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