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beatpie:  I am completely in love with these magnificent photos of Edwardian sisters, some of the earliest color photos ever, taken by their mother Etheldreda Laing in Oxford, England, circa 1908.

beatpie: I am completely in love with these magnificent photos of Edwardian sisters, some of the earliest color photos ever, taken by their mother Etheldreda Laing in Oxford, England, circa

Etheldreda Laing was known for her work with early color photography, particularly for the series of pictures of her daughters.

1910: An innocent Edwardian childhood in color

An innocent Edwardian childhood in color (just a note; Children, particularly girls, would hold flowers to symbolize 'innocence')

The Second Sentence: Window on a Vintage World, Part I: Autochrome

Elderly couple, autochrome, c by . SSPL Science and Society Picture Library

vintage everyday: Women in Autochrome – Breathtaking Color Portrait Photos of Women in the Early 20th Century

vintage everyday: Women in Autochrome – 24 Breathtaking Color Portrait Photos of Women in the Early Century

England: In addition to his estate in France, Albert Kahn kept a house on England’s Cornwall coast. Photographer Auguste Léon posed Kahn’s guests on the cliff overlooking Carbis Bay on August 28, 1913.

A Trip Through Time

In addition to his estate in France, Albert Kahn kept a house on England’s Cornwall coast. Photographer Auguste Léon posed Kahn’s guests on the cliff overlooking Carbis Bay on August

Autochrome Plates. The most improbable object imaginable—the lowly, lumpy potato—played a leading role in the Great Leap Forward of color photography. In 1903 two imaginative French inventors, Auguste and Louis Lumière, seized the pomme de terre and made it the basis for a dazzling new imaging process they called the autochrome, an innovation that would transform a monochromatic world into one gleaming with color. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/in-living-color-161118412/?no-ist

Autochrome Plates. The most improbable object imaginable—the lowly, lumpy potato—played a leading role in the Great Leap Forward of color photography. In 1903 two imaginative French inventors, Auguste and Louis Lumière, seized the pomme de terre and made it the basis for a dazzling new imaging process they called the autochrome, an innovation that would transform a monochromatic world into one gleaming with color. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/in-living-color-161118412/?no-ist

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