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The quokka /(Setonix brachyurus), the only member of the genus Setonix, known locally as the Kangaroo Rat, is a small macropod about the size of a domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family (such as the kangaroos and wallabies), the quokka is herbivorous and mainly nocturnal. It can be found on Rottnest Island just off Perth and Bald Island near Albany.

The quokka /(Setonix brachyurus), the only member of the genus Setonix, known locally as the Kangaroo Rat, is a small macropod about the size of a domestic cat. Like other marsupials in the macropod family (such as the kangaroos and wallabies), the quokka is herbivorous and mainly nocturnal. It can be found on Rottnest Island just off Perth and Bald Island near Albany.

Mummy Mask, A.D. 60–70. Egyptian. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1919 (19.2.6)

Mummy Mask, A.D. 60–70. Egyptian. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1919 (19.2.6)

Ceremonial Axe of pharaoh Ahmose I. The Egyptian Museum, Cairo, Egypt

Ceremonial Axe of King Ahmes

Ceremonial Axe of pharaoh Ahmose I. The Egyptian Museum, Cairo, Egypt

Egyptian cat hunting in the marshes A tawny cat catches birds among the papyrus stems. Cats were family pets in ancient Egypt, but the cat shown here in this context could also represent the Sun-god hunting the enemies of light and order. The cat's unusual gilded eye hints at the religious meanings of this scene. The Tomb-chapel of Nebamun Thebes, Egypt. Late 18th Dynasty, around 1350 BC Salt Collection British Museum, Room 61:

Egyptian cat hunting in the marshes A tawny cat catches birds among the papyrus stems. Cats were family pets in ancient Egypt, but the cat shown here in this context could also represent the Sun-god hunting the enemies of light and order. The cat's unusual gilded eye hints at the religious meanings of this scene. The Tomb-chapel of Nebamun Thebes, Egypt. Late 18th Dynasty, around 1350 BC Salt Collection British Museum, Room 61:

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