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Brief van Isaac Lazarus Israëls (1865-1934) aan Willem Arnold Witsen (1860-1923)

Brief van Isaac Lazarus Israëls aan Willem Arnold Witsen

Ancient Egyptian scripts used to write Egyptian, an Afro-Asiatic language spoken in Egypt until about the 10th century AD. After that it continued to be used as a the liturgical language of Egyptian Christians, the Copts, in the form of Coptic. These glyphs alone could be used to write Ancient Egyptian and represent the first alphabet ever divised. In practice, they were rarely used in the fashion. (...)

Ancient Egyptian scripts used to write Egyptian, an Afro-Asiatic language spoken in Egypt until about the century AD. After that it continued to be used as a the liturgical language of Egyptian Christians, the Copts, in the form of Coptic. These glyp

"Semblance" This is an old sailor's ghost story written by  Eleanor Perry-Smith that was penned in Spencerian script and illustrated. By Jake Weidmann

DIY Nail Art

"Semblance" This is an old sailor's ghost story written by my dear friend, Eleanor Perry-Smith than I penned in Spencerian script and illustrated. By Jake Weidmann Boat ~ ship ~ sailing ~ words ~ book ~ page ~ read ~ sailor ~ sea ~ ocean

The Morgan Library & Museum Online Exhibitions - Beatrix Potter: The Picture Letters - Letter to Noel Moore, June 4, 1895, page 1

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The Morgan Library & Museum Online Exhibitions - Beatrix Potter: The Picture Letters - Letter to Noel Moore, June 1895

Kanji are actually most of the time just pictures of what they are describing! Super helpful for remembering kanji

Learn Japanese

Kanji are actually most of the time just pictures of what they are describing! Super helpful for remembering kanji aka Japanese

The picture above should give a visual representation of each time your pen should lift while you are writing the word “hello” – the little x’s divide up each individual stroke. You may also notice that across the word the little x marks almost line up into a line because you want your exit strokes for each letter to be at about the mid-line level. This will help you to connect the letters a little bit better & more consistently throughout your words.

Step Four: Get Started Working on Letter Connections

The picture above should give a visual representation of each time your pen should lift while you are writing the word “hello” – the little x’s divide up each individual stroke. You may also notice that across the word the little x marks almost line up into a line because you want your exit strokes for each letter to be at about the mid-line level. This will help you to connect the letters a little bit better & more consistently throughout your words.

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