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Certificate received by Ted Worthington as a member of the state championship American Legion team, 1953. His team, the Topeka Mosby-Macks, defeated Olathe, 11-4, in the state title game played in Olathe on August 3. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Ted Worthington)

Certificate received by Ted Worthington as a member of the state championship American Legion team, 1953. His team, the Topeka Mosby-Macks, defeated Olathe, 11-4, in the state title game played in Olathe on August 3. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Ted Worthington)

Topeka Mosby-Macks, 1953. The team, which represented Capitol Post 1, won the state American Legion championship by defeating Olathe, 11-4. To secure the title, the Macks had to advance through the losers' bracket, winning five games in three days. Future major leaguer Jim Golden (kneeling, second from right) had 18 strikeouts in the championship game. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Ted Worthington)

Topeka Mosby-Macks, 1953. The team, which represented Capitol Post 1, won the state American Legion championship by defeating Olathe, 11-4. To secure the title, the Macks had to advance through the losers' bracket, winning five games in three days. Future major leaguer Jim Golden (kneeling, second from right) had 18 strikeouts in the championship game. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Ted Worthington)

Player transaction involving Ed Wilson of Topeka, 1951. This form was used to transfer Wilson from the Paris, Illinois minor league team to the Fulton, Kentucky, minor league team. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Linda Hammond)

Player transaction involving Ed Wilson of Topeka, 1951. This form was used to transfer Wilson from the Paris, Illinois minor league team to the Fulton, Kentucky, minor league team. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Linda Hammond)

Topeka Mosby-Macks, 1951. The team finished second in the state American Legion tournament played in Russell. The roster included future major leaguer Jim Golden (middle row, second from right). Three others would play in the minor leagues, including Tom Sleeper, Don Luttrell, and Ted Worthington. For player IDs, follow the Kansas Memory link. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Ted Worthington)

Topeka Mosby-Macks, 1951. The team finished second in the state American Legion tournament played in Russell. The roster included future major leaguer Jim Golden (middle row, second from right). Three others would play in the minor leagues, including Tom Sleeper, Don Luttrell, and Ted Worthington. For player IDs, follow the Kansas Memory link. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Ted Worthington)

Original design sketch for the Ken Berry League complex near 61st and Wanamaker, 1970. (Courtesy of the Beany and Margaret Conwell family.)

Original design sketch for the Ken Berry League complex near 61st and Wanamaker, 1970. (Courtesy of the Beany and Margaret Conwell family.)

Page from Paul Packer's scrapbook, 1951. Packer was a member of the Topeka Mosby-Macks American Legion team. This scrapbook page features an article about Bob Perry, the team's coach. The Mosby-Macks finished second in the American Legion state tournament. To see more of the scrapbook's articles about the 1951 Mosby-Macks, follow the link to the Kansas Memory website.  (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Paul Packer)

Page from Paul Packer's scrapbook, 1951. Packer was a member of the Topeka Mosby-Macks American Legion team. This scrapbook page features an article about Bob Perry, the team's coach. The Mosby-Macks finished second in the American Legion state tournament. To see more of the scrapbook's articles about the 1951 Mosby-Macks, follow the link to the Kansas Memory website. (SCBHOF/KHS; courtesy of Paul Packer)

First page of a contract offered to pitcher Abe "Junior" Coffman by the Elmira, NY club, 1947. He did not sign it, however. Junior Coffman was one of several Coffman family members who formed the nucleus of Topeka's successful Decker Oilers semi-pro team. He also was on the pitching staff of the Topeka Owls in 1946, delivering the first no-hitter ever pitched in Owl Park. (Courtesy of Larry Coffman.)

First page of a contract offered to pitcher Abe "Junior" Coffman by the Elmira, NY club, 1947. He did not sign it, however. Junior Coffman was one of several Coffman family members who formed the nucleus of Topeka's successful Decker Oilers semi-pro team. He also was on the pitching staff of the Topeka Owls in 1946, delivering the first no-hitter ever pitched in Owl Park. (Courtesy of Larry Coffman.)

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