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Intercepted by Gravitation

Jean-Honoré Fragonard (French, 1732–1806). The Love Letter, ca. 1770. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Jules Bache Collection, 1949 (49.7.49) | It has not been possible to decipher the inscription on the card the woman holds in this painting, to identify the model, or to decide whether this famous canvas should be read as a portrait or a genre scene. #OneMetManyWorlds

Christian Wilhelm Ernst Dietrich, (German, Weimar 1712–1774 Dresden). Surprised, or Infidelity Found Out. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, 1871 (71.142)

GLITCH ART Breath is the bridge which connects life to consciousness, which unites your body to your thoughts. Whenever your mind becomes scattered, use your breath as the means to take hold of your mind again. — Thich Nhat Hanh

Auguste Renoir, (French, 1841–1919). Marguerite-Thérèse (Margot) Berard (1874–1956), 1879. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Bequest of Stephen C. Clark, 1960 (61.101.15) #kids

James Tissot (French, 1836–1902). En plein soleil, ca.1881. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Charles Wrightsman, 2006 (2006.278) #kids

Salvator Rosa (Italian, 1615–1673). Self-Portrait, ca. 1647. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Bequest of Mary L. Harrison, 1921 (21.105) | According to the inscription, this picture was a gift by Rosa to his friend Giovanni Battista Ricciardi (1624–1686), a man of letters from Pisa. Although it was later described as a portrait of Ricciardi, the figure resembles Rosa and it is likely to be a self-portrait.

Circle of Baldassarre Franceschini (il Volterrano) (Italian, 1611–1690). Study for a Horse's Head, ca. 1650. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Harry G. Friedman, 1957 (57.658.91)

Henri Fantin-Latour (French, 1836–1904). Self-Portrait, ca. 1858. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Catharine Lorillard Wolfe Collection, Wolfe Fund, 1995 (1995.91) | At the beginning of his career, between 1854 and 1861, Fantin-Latour executed a large number of self-portraits in chalk, charcoal, and oil.