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Georgian Eye Jewelry Eye miniatures or Lovers’ eyes were Georgian miniatures, normally watercolour on ivory, depicting the eye or eyes of a spouse, loved one or child. These were usually commissioned for sentimental reasons and were often worn as bracelets, brooches, pendants or rings with richly decorated frames, serving the same emotional need as lockets hiding portraits or locks of hair. This fad started in the late 1700s .

Georgian Eye Jewelry Eye miniatures or Lovers’ eyes were Georgian miniatures, normally watercolour on ivory, depicting the eye or eyes of a spouse, loved one or child. These were usually commissioned for sentimental reasons and were often worn as bracelets, brooches, pendants or rings with richly decorated frames, serving the same emotional need as lockets hiding portraits or locks of hair. This fad started in the late 1700s .

Georgian eye miniature brooch Circa 1820s: Lover's eye miniature painted on ivory set in 18K gold enhanced by blue enamel. This lovely lady is a rarity due to her red-gold hair, a lock of which is encased in the locked on the back of the pin.

Georgian eye miniature brooch Circa 1820s: Lover's eye miniature painted on ivory set in 18K gold enhanced by blue enamel. This lovely lady is a rarity due to her red-gold hair, a lock of which is encased in the locked on the back of the pin.

Eye Miniature Portrait, Gerald Sinclair Hayward (1845-1926), a Canadian miniature painter who was working in New York when this was painted in 1905

Eye Miniature Portrait, Gerald Sinclair Hayward (1845-1926), a Canadian miniature painter who was working in New York when this was painted in 1905

“lover’s eyes,” hand-painted miniatures of single human eyes set in jewelry and given as tokens of affection or remembrance. In 1785, when the Prince of Wales secretly proposed to Mrs. Maria Fitzherbert with a miniature of his own eye, he inspired an aristocratic fad for exchanging eye portraits mounted in a wide variety of settings including brooches, rings, lockets, and toothpick cases.

“lover’s eyes,” hand-painted miniatures of single human eyes set in jewelry and given as tokens of affection or remembrance. In 1785, when the Prince of Wales secretly proposed to Mrs. Maria Fitzherbert with a miniature of his own eye, he inspired an aristocratic fad for exchanging eye portraits mounted in a wide variety of settings including brooches, rings, lockets, and toothpick cases.

Georgian Mourning Pin. Under the thick beveled crystal is an expertly rendered shell cameo of a grieving woman at the grave site of her beloved. The cameo is framed and then surrounded by woven hair of the dear departed. Late 18th to early 19th century.

Georgian Mourning Pin. Under the thick beveled crystal is an expertly rendered shell cameo of a grieving woman at the grave site of her beloved. The cameo is framed and then surrounded by woven hair of the dear departed. Late 18th to early 19th century.

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