Explore Mourning Jewelry, Pearl Brooch and more!

Victorian 15ct Gold, Onyx & Seed Pearl Brooch

Victorian 15ct Gold, Onyx & Seed Pearl Brooch

This ring dates from 1728; the absolute height of the memento mori style. It not only features the affectation of the ‘coffin’ shaped crystal, but it encapsulates the skeleton inlaid in black enamel around the band. Further to this, the element of the full skeleton inside the coffin crystal completes the sentiment. There is nowhere on the jewel that death is not represented.

This ring dates from the height of the memento mori style. It features a coffin-shaped crystal with a full skeleton inside, plus a skeleton inlaid in black enamel curves around the band.

During the reign of Queen Victoria protocol dictated that only Jet jewellery could be worn at court during periods of official mourning. c1850

Victoria Brooch The carved Whitby Jet brooch is a classic item of mourning jewellery, circa an expensive commissioned item would have been produced by one of the master carvers.

c.1790-1820: Georgian Eye Jewellery “Eye miniatures came into fashion at the end of the 18th century. In France, where eye miniature seems to have originated, the eye as symbol of watchfulness was adopted by the state police for buckles and belts. In Britain it had a role as a love token, with some eye miniatures glistening with a trompe-l’oeil tear, or a diamond set to imitate a tear.  V and A M

Georgian Eye Jewelry Eye miniatures or Lovers’ eyes were Georgian miniatures, normally watercolour on ivory, depicting the eye or eyes of a spouse, loved one or child. These were usually commissioned for sentimental reasons and were often worn as bracelet

Scrimshaw Double Heart Mourning Jewelry Circa 1807 ~  A lovely memorial for a departed loved one.  "Beauty & youth in vain to these you trust  For youth & beauty shall be laid in dust."

Scrimshaw Double Heart Mourning Jewelry Circa 1807 ~ A lovely memorial for a departed loved one. "Beauty & youth in vain to these you trust For youth & beauty shall be laid in dust.

A piece of Victorian mourning jewelry made with human hair locks.                                                                                                                                                                                 More

CREEPY CORNER: Nobody Does Macabre Quite Like the Victorians

A piece of Victorian mourning jewellery made with human hair locks.

Hairwork is found on the back of a brooch, whose front depicts sentimental rather than mourning imagery.

Image detail for -. hair jewelry and spoke about how mourning jewelry differs from

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