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Ring decorated with a cameo depicting of Satyr and Nymph. Gold, cornelian, onyx. Ca. 50 BCE — 20 CE. Weight 10.08 g, bezel 3.25 × 2.27 cm. Inv. No. Misc. 7066 = FG 11067.

Ring decorated with a cameo depicting of Satyr and Nymph. Gold, cornelian, onyx. Ca. 50 BCE — 20 CE. Weight 10.08 g, bezel 3.25 × 2.27 cm. Inv. No. Misc. 7066 = FG 11067.

Coin made from electrum, an alloy of gold and silver. From western modern Turkey One of the very earliest coins The Greek historian Herodotus, writing in the fifth century BC, stated that 'the Lydians were the first people we know to have struck and used coinage of silver and gold. Photo: © Trustees of the British Museum

Coin made from electrum, an alloy of gold and silver. From western modern Turkey One of the very earliest coins The Greek historian Herodotus, writing in the fifth century BC, stated that 'the Lydians were the first people we know to have struck and used coinage of silver and gold. Photo: © Trustees of the British Museum

Decorative objects, mainly jewelry and trappings for horses, tents, and wagons, produced by nomadic Scythian tribes that roamed Central Asia and eastern Europe between the 7th century and the 2nd century . Also known as Steppes art, it largely features representations of real or mythical beasts worked in a wide variety of materials, including wood, leather, bone, appliqu felt, bronze, iron, silver, gold, and electrum.

Decorative objects, mainly jewelry and trappings for horses, tents, and wagons, produced by nomadic Scythian tribes that roamed Central Asia and eastern Europe between the 7th century and the 2nd century . Also known as Steppes art, it largely features representations of real or mythical beasts worked in a wide variety of materials, including wood, leather, bone, appliqu felt, bronze, iron, silver, gold, and electrum.

G1171 An Excessively Rare and Exceptional Greek Electrum Hekte of Phokaia (Ionia), Beautifully Struck, Probably the Finest Example Known of this Issue | Flickr: Intercambio de fotos

G1171 An Excessively Rare and Exceptional Greek Electrum Hekte of Phokaia (Ionia), Beautifully Struck, Probably the Finest Example Known of this Issue | Flickr: Intercambio de fotos

Priam’s Treasure discovered by archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann. He claimed the site to be that of ancient Troy, and assigned the artifacts to the Homeric king Priam. It is now thought to be a result of Schliemann's zeal to find sites and objects mentioned in the Homeric epics. Archaeologist Carl Blegen claimed the layer in which Priam's Treasure was found was assigned to Troy II, whereas Priam would have been king of Troy VI or VII, occupied hundreds of years later. @Wikipedia

Priam’s Treasure discovered by archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann. He claimed the site to be that of ancient Troy, and assigned the artifacts to the Homeric king Priam. It is now thought to be a result of Schliemann's zeal to find sites and objects mentioned in the Homeric epics. Archaeologist Carl Blegen claimed the layer in which Priam's Treasure was found was assigned to Troy II, whereas Priam would have been king of Troy VI or VII, occupied hundreds of years later. @Wikipedia

Around 1890 BC. Scarab pendent from Egypt. Reign of Senwosret II, 12th Dynasty. Winged scarab of electrum, inlaid with carnelian, green feldspar, and lapis lazuli. This piece of jewellery is a pendant in the form of a winged scarab. It is made of electrum (a naturally occurring alloy of gold and silver) inlaid with carnelian, green feldspar and lapis lazuli. Two small tubes on the underside of the object were used to suspend it.

Around 1890 BC. Scarab pendent from Egypt. Reign of Senwosret II, 12th Dynasty. Winged scarab of electrum, inlaid with carnelian, green feldspar, and lapis lazuli. This piece of jewellery is a pendant in the form of a winged scarab. It is made of electrum (a naturally occurring alloy of gold and silver) inlaid with carnelian, green feldspar and lapis lazuli. Two small tubes on the underside of the object were used to suspend it.

Electron - the World's Earliest Coins at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem

Electron - the World's Earliest Coins at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem

Gold stater [Greek, Lydian; Excavated at Sardis], ca. 560-546 BC. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Gold stater [Greek, Lydian; Excavated at Sardis], ca. 560-546 BC. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Electrum Vessel with Green Eye Powder and Gold Shell, Tomb of Queen Pu-ali. British Museum, London

Electrum Vessel with Green Eye Powder and Gold Shell, Tomb of Queen Pu-ali. British Museum, London

Unique Gorgoneion Coin of Abydos, Troas, c. 410 BCThe only known gold coin from this period in Abydos.Obverse: ABYΔ / HNON (the lower part of the legend retrograde) with and eagle standing left. Reverse: a gorgoneion within an incuse square. Abydos (map) was a colony of Miletos, situated on the Hellespont, and was perhaps an early location of the minting of electrum staters in the sixth century BC. The city had been part of the Athenian empire during the fifth century until it revolted in…

Unique Gorgoneion Coin of Abydos, Troas, c. 410 BCThe only known gold coin from this period in Abydos.Obverse: ABYΔ / HNON (the lower part of the legend retrograde) with and eagle standing left. Reverse: a gorgoneion within an incuse square. Abydos (map) was a colony of Miletos, situated on the Hellespont, and was perhaps an early location of the minting of electrum staters in the sixth century BC. The city had been part of the Athenian empire during the fifth century until it revolted in…

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