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One type of Egúngún, called Egúngún Àgbà (literally “senior/elder Egúngún”), 1986. This one probably honors a royal lineage, as indicated by the beaded veil reminiscent of those on royal beaded crowns. The horns probably indicate a family history of warriors or hunters. Photo by Margaret T. Drewal.

Egúngún / Mysteries Concealed in Magical Cloth – Manual

Africa | Royal headdress.  Yoruba people.  20th century. Fiber and glass beads | Beaded items have long been associated with royalty among the Yoruba. Cone-like crowns like this one are primary symbols of a king's authority. When wearing it, a king becomes connected to royal ancestors, thereby strengthening his authority.  Since it is prohibited for people to gaze directly at the king's head, a veil is included to conceal him.

One of the Yoruba kings' head dresses made of glass beads and fibres. The bird at the top is okin, symbol of kingship; the top side ones are aluko and the bottom ones surrounding the mask are odidere,

Africa | "Type de Femme et genre de Coiffure Sakalava - Région de Nossi-Bé" Madagascar || Vintage postcard. Publisher E. Chatard. No.29

Africa | "Type de Femme et genre de Coiffure Sakalava - Région de Nossi-Bé" Madagascar || Vintage postcard. Publisher E. Chatard. No.29

Asaro tribe warriors in mud and pig's faces at Mount Hagen Sing-Sing, Papua New Guinea

Asaro tribe warriors in mud and pig face at Mount Hagen Sing-Sing, Papua New Guinea

Egungun

Egungun

Maasai Warriors

Maasai Warriors wearing hats made from the mane of a lion that they have each killed. When the warrior becomes a Junior elder he must throw the lion mane head gear away through a sacrificial event to keep off bad spirits

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