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Artemis of Ephesus - Livius

Artemis of Ephesus - Livius

Selçuk, Museum of Ephesus - LiviusThe large statue of Artemis from the Prytanaeum of Ephesus

Selçuk, Museum of Ephesus - LiviusThe large statue of Artemis from the Prytanaeum of Ephesus

Artemis of Ephesus - Livius

Artemis of Ephesus - Livius

Artemis of Ephesus. Statue from the Amphitheater of  Lepcis Magna. Originally flanked by two animals

Artemis of Ephesus. Statue from the Amphitheater of Lepcis Magna. Originally flanked by two animals

Artemis of Ephesus - Livius

Artemis of Ephesus - Livius

One of many marble Artemis Ephesia statues from what used to be Lydia, now western Turkey.  Some scholars think the name Upis, which is older than Artemis in these parts, may be a hellenization of Hepatu / Hebat, a Hurrian goddess who was adopted by the Hittites and consequently got a lot of play under their empire. Names have a way of sticking around. The -is ending is a Greek feminine form, also seen in Isis, Sothis, and lots of Kemetic names --not the original form.

One of many marble Artemis Ephesia statues from what used to be Lydia, now western Turkey. Some scholars think the name Upis, which is older than Artemis in these parts, may be a hellenization of Hepatu / Hebat, a Hurrian goddess who was adopted by the Hittites and consequently got a lot of play under their empire. Names have a way of sticking around. The -is ending is a Greek feminine form, also seen in Isis, Sothis, and lots of Kemetic names --not the original form.

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