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Maria Francisca of Savoy wearing a decorated hurluberlu coiffure by ? (location unknown to gogm) | Grand Ladies | gogm

Maria Francisca of Savoy wearing a decorated hurluberlu coiffure by ? (location unknown to gogm) | Grand Ladies | gogm

Presumed Mary of Modena by a member of the entourage of Jacob Ferdinand Voet (location unknown to gogm) | Grand Ladies | gogm

Presumed Mary of Modena by a member of the entourage of Jacob Ferdinand Voet (location unknown to gogm) | Grand Ladies | gogm

Marie Anne de Bourbon, princesse de Conti by Henri Bonnart | Grand Ladies | gogm

Marie Anne de Bourbon, princesse de Conti by Henri Bonnart | Grand Ladies | gogm

Henriette Catherine de Joyeuse, duchesse de Montpensier, puis de Guise (1585-1656) by ? (Versailles) | Grand Ladies | gogm

Henriette Catherine de Joyeuse, duchesse de Montpensier, puis de Guise (1585-1656) by ? (Versailles) | Grand Ladies | gogm

Hortense Mancini, Duchess of Mazarin, half-length, in a pale blue dress with blue and black bows attribued to Jacob Ferdinand Voet (auctioned by Bonhams) UPGRADE the lost gallery

Hortense Mancini, Duchess of Mazarin, half-length, in a pale blue dress with blue and black bows attribued to Jacob Ferdinand Voet (auctioned by Bonhams) UPGRADE the lost gallery

ca. 1635 Catherine Murray, née Bruce, Countess of Dysart, by Sir Anthonis van Dyck (Philip Mould)

ca. 1635 Catherine Murray, née Bruce, Countess of Dysart, by Sir Anthonis van Dyck (Philip Mould)

Tom Durie, fool of Queen Anne of Demark, 1614 Tom Derry or Durie was the ‘fool’ employed by Queen Anne of Denmark,the wife of King James VI and I.Monarchs and some aristocrats maintained the medieval tradition of keeping a fool or jester as part of their household until well into the seventeenth century. A much-loved servant, the Queen commissioned portraits of Derry by two of her favourite artists. by lisby1, via Flickr

Tom Durie, fool of Queen Anne of Demark, 1614 Tom Derry or Durie was the ‘fool’ employed by Queen Anne of Denmark,the wife of King James VI and I.Monarchs and some aristocrats maintained the medieval tradition of keeping a fool or jester as part of their household until well into the seventeenth century. A much-loved servant, the Queen commissioned portraits of Derry by two of her favourite artists. by lisby1, via Flickr