Explore The Grain, Draping and more!

DJ7-The bodice of the Vionnet Dress. The bias is lined up at the bust point (princess seam line). It will be more helpful to label the grain, cross grain and the bias. Jessica also suggested to drape in stripe fabric. Stripe fabric makes it clear to know where the grain line is without actually having to mark it.

DJ7-The bodice of the Vionnet Dress. The bias is lined up at the bust point (princess seam line). It will be more helpful to label the grain, cross grain and the bias. Jessica also suggested to drape in stripe fabric. Stripe fabric makes it clear to know where the grain line is without actually having to mark it.

2) Since my bodice is asymmetrical, for the back I attached a piece of fabric at the shoulder seam and then drew the shape I wanted. To create the right shaping, I put the draped shoulder piece over top to see if it would be a flattering panel shape once the piece was draped over the back.

2) Since my bodice is asymmetrical, for the back I attached a piece of fabric at the shoulder seam and then drew the shape I wanted. To create the right shaping, I put the draped shoulder piece over top to see if it would be a flattering panel shape once the piece was draped over the back.

DJ7-Back view of the Vionnet dress. When pinning the pieces together, it is crucial to note where seam lines connect, and mark as a notch.

view of the Vionnet dress. When pinning the pieces together, it is crucial to note where seam lines connect, and mark as a notch.

DJ8- Jessica taught me how to add ease to the block. Men especially need ease in suits to move around. The amount of ease varies, and I added 1cm. I shifted the side seam 1cm in (towards CF), which ultimately creates 1cm ease for the body. After adding the ease, the block went from fitted to semi-fitted with room for movement.

DJ8- Jessica taught me how to add ease to the block. Men especially need ease in suits to move around. The amount of ease varies, and I added 1cm. I shifted the side seam 1cm in (towards CF), which ultimately creates 1cm ease for the body. After adding the ease, the block went from fitted to semi-fitted with room for movement.

DJ1-This is the finished version of the fitted draped bodice. Altering dart, snipping and trimming helped to reduce the drag lines. One thing that I found interesting was the difference between flat pattern and actually working on a dress form. The darts and lines all turned out curvy in order for the bodice to fit like a glove. Also, noticing the original bust line curves up when it's on body, shows how curvy the body is compare to flat paper patterns.

DJ1-This is the finished version of the fitted draped bodice. Altering dart, snipping and trimming helped to reduce the drag lines. One thing that I found interesting was the difference between flat pattern and actually working on a dress form. The darts and lines all turned out curvy in order for the bodice to fit like a glove. Also, noticing the original bust line curves up when it's on body, shows how curvy the body is compare to flat paper patterns.

10-Back of the Muslin block. Draping the back piece is similar to draping the front piece. I learned that in menswear, center back is usually seamed to create shaping.

of the Muslin block. Draping the back piece is similar to draping the front piece. I learned that in menswear, center back is usually seamed to create shaping.

Vionnet. Colección otoño-invierno 2015/2016.Paris

Fotos de Pasarela

4. After sewing the darts, sewed side seams and shoulder seams of the top, and then sewed the pants, and attached it together before sewing the placket

After sewing the darts, sewed side seams and shoulder seams of the top, and then sewed the pants, and attached it together before sewing the placket

DJ1-We started from draping bodice. The weft and grain line are absolutely important because they give a broad idea of where the garment should sit before you start adding darts and design lines. After I pinned the bodice, the excess fabric I made into two bust darts. I then noticed drag lines forming around the bust area. What would have worked to reduce them are adjusting the placement of dart, the amount/size of dart. Sometimes it might also be the pinning (too tight or too loose).

DJ1-We started from draping bodice. The weft and grain line are absolutely important because they give a broad idea of where the garment should sit before you start adding darts and design lines. After I pinned the bodice, the excess fabric I made into two bust darts. I then noticed drag lines forming around the bust area. What would have worked to reduce them are adjusting the placement of dart, the amount/size of dart. Sometimes it might also be the pinning (too tight or too loose).

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