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2004 - Lava creeps over a house in Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland's most important fishing port, forcing evacuation of its inhabitants as well as others during Iceland's volcanic eruption of the century.

BOOM | trans-ideal

There she blows When the runny and hot (some 1200 Celsius) basaltic lava that erupts out of Kilauea on the island of Hawaii passes over something wet, the water flashes into steam and escapes out to.

Pu'u 'O'o, Hawaii

Popular Volcanoes in Hawaii / Erupting lava, Pu'u 'O'o, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

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Kilauea Volcano, river of lava entering the Pacific Ocean.

the Bardarbunga volcano, which lies underneath the Vatnajökull glacier (Iceland)

13 Vivacious Volcanoes That Have Nothing But Lava For The Human Race

Hawaii is the most geographically isolated land mass in the world! What does that mean for the plants and animals there?

Enter at your own risk. Pictured is the “Mother's Day flow.” One branch of the lava stream drips down small cliff at head of bench, and one flows onto bench.

The volcanoes of Hawaii. One of the few   places on earth where you can find a scene like this.

Hawaii Volcanoes

, Big Island Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, established in is one of the world's top wonders.Hawaii Volcano National Park encompasses acres and ranges from sea level to the summit of the earth's most massive

Explosion from Sakurajima volcano, Japan, October 2013

Powerful strombolian explosion from Sakurajima volcano, Japan, at UTC on 27 Sep 2013 local time) (Photo: Tom Pfeiffer)

Photo by Olivier Grunewald. His simple explanation for the spectacular electric blue glow of the Kawah Ijen volcano in Indonesia: "This blue glow, unusual for a volcano, isn't the lava itself, as unfortunately can be read on many websites. It is due to the combustion of sulfuric gases in contact with air temperatures above 360°C." ~Smithsonian Magazine

Kawah Ijen volcano in Indonesia: "This blue glow, unusual for a volcano, isn't the lava itself, as unfortunately can be read on many websites. It is due to the combustion of sulfuric gases in contact with air temperatures above ~Smithsonian Magazine

new lava from Holuhraun eruption

The lava from the eruption at Holuhraun is flowing at a rate of approximately 100 meters per hour. It now covers square km square miles), an area larger than Hafnarfjörður, a town outside Reykjavík.

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