Explore Lincoln Assassination, Abraham Lincoln, and more!

The house where Lincoln died (It's right across the street from Ford's Theater)

The house where Lincoln died (It's right across the street from Ford's Theater)

The house in which Lincoln died, at 453 (now 516) 10th Street, NW, was built by William Petersen, a tailor of Swedish descent, in 1849. It is a three-story building, with the basement only slightly below the street level. Since the house had more rooms than the family required, he rented his extra rooms to lodgers.The bedroom to which Lincoln was taken was occupied by William T. Clark,

The boarding house where Lincoln died. It sits at 516 Street, NW, Washington, DC. It was built by William Petersen in a three-story building with the basement slightly below street level.

Petersen House, where Abraham Lincoln was carried and died after assassin John Wilkes Booth mortally wounded him across the street at Ford's Theatre, Washington, D.C.  [As house stands and looks today]

Row houses - still my favorite. Petersen House, where Abraham Lincoln was carried and died after assassin John Wilkes Booth mortally wounded him across the street at Ford's Theatre, Washington, D. [As house stands and looks today]

The Petersen House is a 19th-century federal style rowhouse located at 516 10th Street NW in Washington, D.C. On April 15, 1865, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln died there after being shot the previous evening at Ford's Theatre, which was located across the street. The house was built in 1849 by William A. Petersen, a German tailor.

The Petersen House is a federal style rowhouse located at 516 Street NW in Washington, D. On April United States President Abraham Lincoln died there after being shot the previous evening at Ford's Theater, which was located across the street.

This flag was draped outside Lincoln's theater box the night he was shot by John Wilkes at Ford's Theatre. "Someone inside the box grabbed the flag from outside and used it to cradle Lincoln's head until they could carry him from Ford's Theatre to Peterson house."  Jeannie Gourlay, actress in "Our American Cousin", which was playing that night, and daughter of Thomas Gourlay, kept the flag in her possession until she died in 1924.

This flag was draped outside Lincoln's theater box the night he was shot by John Wilkes at Ford's Theatre. "Someone inside the box grabbed the flag from outside and used it to cradle Lincoln's head until they could carry him from Ford's Theatre to Peterson house." Jeannie Gourlay, actress in "Our American Cousin", which was playing that night, and daughter of Thomas Gourlay, kept the flag in her possession until she died in 1924.

This is one of the pillows that President Lincoln rested on before dying from his wounds across the street at the Peterson House. The pillow is still stained with President Lincoln's blood.

This is one of the pillows that President Lincoln rested on before dying from his wounds across the street at the Peterson House. The pillow is still stained with President Lincoln's blood.

This thirty-four-star American flag reportedly covered Lincoln’s body as it was transported from the Petersen House to the White House on the morning of April 15, 1865. During the war, some advisors had urged Lincoln to remove stars representing southern states from U.S. flags but Lincoln refused to do so, based on his belief that secession was invalid and that the Union was perpetual.

This thirty-four-star American flag covered Lincoln’s casket as it was transported from the Petersen House to the White House on the morning of April 1865

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