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Gown1785The Victoria & Albert Museum

Gown Place of origin: France (possibly, made) Date: ca. 1785 (made) Artist/Maker: unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Silk and printed cotton, lined with linen, hand-sewn

Half Mourning Dress  1790-1800  Swiss National Museum

ephemeral-elegance: “ Woven Half Mourning Dress, ca. (Did they have mourning attire rules in I thought that was more a thing in place once Victoria lost Albert?

Mantua, 1740-1745

Mantua, Embroidered silk with colored silk & silver thread. Court dress was an exclusive & ornate style of clothing worn by the aristocracy who attended Court. The style is based on the mantua.

Robe à l’Anglaise 1760s The Victoria & Albert Museum

Robe à l’Anglaise 1760s The Victoria & Albert Museum (OMG that dress!)

V remade from silk and linen This gown features a rose-red silk with trails of ivory flowers woven in a complex technique. The fabric, a type of silk known as gros de tours, dates from the but the gown itself has been remade into the style of the

1790 Riding Coat and Waistcoat at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

[Previous pinner quoted] 1790 British Woman's Riding Coat and Waistcoat at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London - "Or, at least, I think this is a woman's coat. It wasn't labelled as such, but looking at the proportions.

Stays  1770-1790  © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Il peut aussi y avoir des couleurs qui claquent.

1770 - 1790 Stays Place of origin: England (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Silk damask, lined with linen, reinforced with whalebone, hand-sewn.

Robe à la Française - 1770-1775 - The Victoria & Albert Museum

Robe and petticoat Place of origin: United Kingdom (made) Date: (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Brocaded silk, trimmed with fly fringe, lined with linen, hand-sewn Credit Line: Given by Miss Mary Hodgson Museum number:

Wedding dress of Queen Frederica, 1797. Not neoclassical, but more in the style of the Ancien Regime.

fripperiesandfobs: “ Wedding dress of Queen Frederica, 1797 From the Royal Armory and Hallwyl Museum ”

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