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a group for the enjoyment and celebration of all things stitched in Sashiko style.   From Wikipedia:  Sashiko (literally "little stabs") is a form of decorative reinforcement stitching (or functional embroidery) from Japan. Traditionally used to reinforce points of wear, or to repair worn places or tears with patches, this running stitch technique is often used for purely decorative purposes in quilting and embroidery.

a group for the enjoyment and celebration of all things stitched in Sashiko style. From Wikipedia: Sashiko (literally "little stabs") is a form of decorative reinforcement stitching (or functional embroidery) from Japan. Traditionally used to reinforce points of wear, or to repair worn places or tears with patches, this running stitch technique is often used for purely decorative purposes in quilting and embroidery.

Aderyn Caniad. Birdsong.  Shibori resist  Indigo on linen  2011  Images:  Pinegate

Aderyn Caniad. Birdsong. Shibori resist Indigo on linen 2011 Images: Pinegate

Super helpful Shibori Indigo Dye tutorial on HonestlyWTF. They showed several different binding techniques and all the different results look awesome!

DIY Shibori

Super helpful Shibori Indigo Dye tutorial on HonestlyWTF. They showed several different binding techniques and all the different results look awesome!

dying a mandala! love it!!!

a quick mandala dyeing workshop post

Mokume shibori technique from Japanese Textile Workshops #japanesetextileworkshops #copyrightagencycareerfund

Mokume shibori technique from Japanese Textile Workshops #japanesetextileworkshops #copyrightagencycareerfund

Pull up the threads from their loose ends. I must stress this: use ALL of your might without breaking the threads to tighten up, scrunching your piece into a tiny, tight mass. Otherwise, the dye will be able to seep in and you won’t get a clear pattern. Tie the thread ends together in pairs, holding tightly. Be careful not to let it loosen up while tying.

Pull up the threads from their loose ends. I must stress this: use ALL of your might without breaking the threads to tighten up, scrunching your piece into a tiny, tight mass. Otherwise, the dye will be able to seep in and you won’t get a clear pattern. Tie the thread ends together in pairs, holding tightly. Be careful not to let it loosen up while tying.

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