Explore Weeks Prompt, Prompt 23 and more!

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This Weeks Prompt: 23. The man who would not sleep—dares not sleep—takes drugs…

This Weeks Prompt: 23. The man who would not sleep—dares not sleep—takes drugs…

Cryptozoology is the study of "hidden" animals. It is a pseudoscience that involves the search for animals or creatures whose existence has not been proven.  Many species that appear in cryptozoological literature are a part of cultural folklore, myths, or legends. There's one critical thing they all have in common:  a lack of evidence of their existence.  All we've…

Cryptozoology is the study of "hidden" animals. It is a pseudoscience that involves the search for animals or creatures whose existence has not been proven. Many species that appear in cryptozoological literature are a part of cultural folklore, myths, or legends. There's one critical thing they all have in common: a lack of evidence of their existence. All we've…

A zmey is a Slavic dragon. They are usually depicted as lizard- or snake-like creatures, with scales, bat wings, and two or four legs. They can spit fire and generally have more than one head. The usual number is three. Much like a hydra, the heads will grow back if they are cut off unless the stump is burned or covered with ash.

Monster Monday: Zmey

A zmey is a Slavic dragon. They are usually depicted as lizard- or snake-like creatures, with scales, bat wings, and two or four legs. They can spit fire and generally have more than one head. The usual number is three. Much like a hydra, the heads will grow back if they are cut off unless the stump is burned or covered with ash.

Drawing of the leontocephaline found at the Mithraeum of C. Valerius Heracles and sons, dedicated 190 AD at Ostia Antica, Italy (CIMRM

Gilliatt had thrust his arm deep into the opening; the monster had snapped at it. It held him fast, as the spider holds the fly.    François Flameng, illustration to Les travailleurs de la mer (The toilers of the sea), from Illustration des oeuvres complètes de Victor Hugo vol. 3 Paris, 1885.    (Source: archive.org)

Gilliatt had thrust his arm deep into the opening; the monster had snapped at it. It held him fast, as the spider holds the fly. François Flameng, illustration to Les travailleurs de la mer (The toilers of the sea), from Illustration des oeuvres complètes de Victor Hugo vol. 3 Paris, 1885. (Source: archive.org)

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