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Did you know that there were Human Zoos on display in Europe and America from the 1870s to the 1950s? These public exhibits of humans, often called Negro Villages, usually showed indigenous people in a so-called natural or primitive state. The displays often emphasized the cultural differences between Europeans of Western civilization and non-European peoples.

48 Celebrities Who Have Killed People

When Laura Bush was in high school, she neglected to stop at a stop sign when she was driving. She hit another car and killed its driver, Michael Dutton Douglas, who happened to be a close friend and classmate.

Human zoos were popular in Europe in the 19th and 20th century. They were also known as “Negro Villages” or “ethnological expositions” where humans were exhibited in their natural state.

Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With The Wind' Turns 75

Margaret Mitchell, pictured above in 1941, started writing while recovering from an ankle injury in 1926. She had read her way through most of Atlanta's Carnegie Library, so her husband brought home a typewriter and said: "Write your own book to amuse yourself." The result was Gone with the Wind.

Did you know that there were Human Zoos on display in Europe and America from the 1870s to the 1950s? These public exhibits of humans, often called Negro Villages, usually showed indigenous people in a so-called natural or primitive state. The displays often emphasized the cultural differences between Europeans of Western civilization and non-European peoples. Above is a photo from Amsterdam Holland around 1890, of an African child in one of these Human Zoo exhibits, being fed like an…

This CDV shows Australian aborigines on display with Hagenback's traveling amusements. This photo was taken at Crystal Palace in 1884 London.

Paris

Selk'nam natives en route to Europe for being exhibited as animals in Human Zoos, 1899. With the permission of the Chilean government in 1889, eleven Selk’nam natives (also known as the Ona), including an 8-year-old were taken to Europe to be exhibited in Human Zoos. These native people of the Patagonian region were a rarity. Between 1878 and 1900, three groups of natives belonging to indigenous groups of Tehuelche, Selk’nam and Kawésqar were shipped to Europe to be exposed in Human Zoos.

The Most Romantic Story In Congress

Vietnam War POW Camps - American POW pilots in the Hanoi Hilton, where one POW was Senator John McCain, a twice Presidential candate

Paris

"Jardin Zoologique D'Acclimattion Somalis Spectacle ethnographique à Paris, en 1892. A partir de 1877, la mode se répand de faire venir des indigènes. exposés dans des enclos, dans de véritables (zoos humains)." Human zoos were popular in Europe in the 19th and 20th century. They were also known as “Negro Villages” or “ethnological expositions” where humans were exhibited in their natural state.

L'Invention du Sauvage (The Invention of the Savage) opened at the Musée du Quai Branly on November 29, 2011. This exposition “unveils the history of women, men and children brought from Africa, Asia, Oceania and America to be exhibited in the Western world in circus numbers, theatre or cabaret performances, fairs, zoos, parades, reconstructed villages or international and colonial fairs.”